Direct and moderating links of salivary alpha-amylase and cortisol stress-reactivity to youth behavioral and emotional adjustment

Maureen A. Allwood, Kathryn Handwerger, Katie T. Kivlighan, Douglas A. Granger, Laura R. Stroud

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies have revealed evidence for interactions between autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity, indexed by saliva alpha amylase (sAA), and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical activity, in predicting psychological functioning. The present study extends this work by examining individual differences in sAA and cortisol stress reactivity in relation to behavioral and emotional adjustment in youth. Participants were 56 healthy children (age 7-16) sAA, cortisol, and other physiological and affective responses were measured before, during, and after stressor tasks (either performance or peer rejection). Basal and stress responsive sAA and cortisol as well as their interactions were assessed in relation to externalizing and internalizing behaviors and trait anxiety sAA was positively related to anxiety, while sAA reactivity moderated associations between cortisol reactivity and problem behavior. Results highlight the importance of measuring multiple physiological systems to elucidate mechanisms underlying behavioral and emotional dysregulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-64
Number of pages8
JournalBiological Psychology
Volume88
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Salivary alpha-Amylases
alpha-Amylases
Saliva
Hydrocortisone
Anxiety
Autonomic Nervous System
Task Performance and Analysis
Individuality
Emotional Adjustment
Psychology

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • ANS
  • Anxiety
  • Behavior
  • Children
  • Cortisol
  • HPA
  • Saliva alpha-amylase
  • SNS
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Direct and moderating links of salivary alpha-amylase and cortisol stress-reactivity to youth behavioral and emotional adjustment. / Allwood, Maureen A.; Handwerger, Kathryn; Kivlighan, Katie T.; Granger, Douglas A.; Stroud, Laura R.

In: Biological Psychology, Vol. 88, No. 1, 09.2011, p. 57-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Allwood, Maureen A. ; Handwerger, Kathryn ; Kivlighan, Katie T. ; Granger, Douglas A. ; Stroud, Laura R. / Direct and moderating links of salivary alpha-amylase and cortisol stress-reactivity to youth behavioral and emotional adjustment. In: Biological Psychology. 2011 ; Vol. 88, No. 1. pp. 57-64.
@article{ec5a1abd3c924c1787480fe20aaef0e4,
title = "Direct and moderating links of salivary alpha-amylase and cortisol stress-reactivity to youth behavioral and emotional adjustment",
abstract = "Recent studies have revealed evidence for interactions between autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity, indexed by saliva alpha amylase (sAA), and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical activity, in predicting psychological functioning. The present study extends this work by examining individual differences in sAA and cortisol stress reactivity in relation to behavioral and emotional adjustment in youth. Participants were 56 healthy children (age 7-16) sAA, cortisol, and other physiological and affective responses were measured before, during, and after stressor tasks (either performance or peer rejection). Basal and stress responsive sAA and cortisol as well as their interactions were assessed in relation to externalizing and internalizing behaviors and trait anxiety sAA was positively related to anxiety, while sAA reactivity moderated associations between cortisol reactivity and problem behavior. Results highlight the importance of measuring multiple physiological systems to elucidate mechanisms underlying behavioral and emotional dysregulation.",
keywords = "Adolescents, ANS, Anxiety, Behavior, Children, Cortisol, HPA, Saliva alpha-amylase, SNS, Stress",
author = "Allwood, {Maureen A.} and Kathryn Handwerger and Kivlighan, {Katie T.} and Granger, {Douglas A.} and Stroud, {Laura R.}",
year = "2011",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1016/j.biopsycho.2011.06.008",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "88",
pages = "57--64",
journal = "Biological Psychology",
issn = "0019-493X",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Direct and moderating links of salivary alpha-amylase and cortisol stress-reactivity to youth behavioral and emotional adjustment

AU - Allwood, Maureen A.

AU - Handwerger, Kathryn

AU - Kivlighan, Katie T.

AU - Granger, Douglas A.

AU - Stroud, Laura R.

PY - 2011/9

Y1 - 2011/9

N2 - Recent studies have revealed evidence for interactions between autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity, indexed by saliva alpha amylase (sAA), and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical activity, in predicting psychological functioning. The present study extends this work by examining individual differences in sAA and cortisol stress reactivity in relation to behavioral and emotional adjustment in youth. Participants were 56 healthy children (age 7-16) sAA, cortisol, and other physiological and affective responses were measured before, during, and after stressor tasks (either performance or peer rejection). Basal and stress responsive sAA and cortisol as well as their interactions were assessed in relation to externalizing and internalizing behaviors and trait anxiety sAA was positively related to anxiety, while sAA reactivity moderated associations between cortisol reactivity and problem behavior. Results highlight the importance of measuring multiple physiological systems to elucidate mechanisms underlying behavioral and emotional dysregulation.

AB - Recent studies have revealed evidence for interactions between autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity, indexed by saliva alpha amylase (sAA), and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical activity, in predicting psychological functioning. The present study extends this work by examining individual differences in sAA and cortisol stress reactivity in relation to behavioral and emotional adjustment in youth. Participants were 56 healthy children (age 7-16) sAA, cortisol, and other physiological and affective responses were measured before, during, and after stressor tasks (either performance or peer rejection). Basal and stress responsive sAA and cortisol as well as their interactions were assessed in relation to externalizing and internalizing behaviors and trait anxiety sAA was positively related to anxiety, while sAA reactivity moderated associations between cortisol reactivity and problem behavior. Results highlight the importance of measuring multiple physiological systems to elucidate mechanisms underlying behavioral and emotional dysregulation.

KW - Adolescents

KW - ANS

KW - Anxiety

KW - Behavior

KW - Children

KW - Cortisol

KW - HPA

KW - Saliva alpha-amylase

KW - SNS

KW - Stress

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80052508866&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80052508866&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2011.06.008

DO - 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2011.06.008

M3 - Article

C2 - 21771636

AN - SCOPUS:80052508866

VL - 88

SP - 57

EP - 64

JO - Biological Psychology

JF - Biological Psychology

SN - 0019-493X

IS - 1

ER -