Digital culture creative classrooms (DC3): Teaching 21st century proficiencies in high schools by engaging students in creative digital projects

David Tinapple, John Sadauskas, Loren Olson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children and young adults are immersed in digital culture, but most are not familiar with the computational thinking behind the latest tools and technologies. There are few opportunities in secondary school curricula for students to learn such practices, but we believe that skills such as computational thinking, creative coding, collaboration, innovation, and information literacy can be taught in a highly effective manner by using aesthetic challenges as a motivation. In other words, by engaging students in creative digital arts projects they are naturally driven to acquire the many new skills to effectively use and understand the computational tools and techniques involved in creating digital and interactive projects. In this paper, we outline a project-based digital arts curriculum through which novice middle/high school students are intrinsically motivated to learn and apply science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) skills and computational thinking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationACM International Conference Proceeding Series
Pages380-383
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Event12th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children, IDC 2013 - New York, NY, United States
Duration: Jun 24 2013Jun 27 2013

Other

Other12th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children, IDC 2013
CountryUnited States
CityNew York, NY
Period6/24/136/27/13

Fingerprint

Teaching
Students
Curricula
Innovation
STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)

Keywords

  • Computer science
  • Digital art
  • Education
  • K-12
  • Motivation
  • Programming
  • STEM

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Software

Cite this

Digital culture creative classrooms (DC3) : Teaching 21st century proficiencies in high schools by engaging students in creative digital projects. / Tinapple, David; Sadauskas, John; Olson, Loren.

ACM International Conference Proceeding Series. 2013. p. 380-383.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Tinapple, D, Sadauskas, J & Olson, L 2013, Digital culture creative classrooms (DC3): Teaching 21st century proficiencies in high schools by engaging students in creative digital projects. in ACM International Conference Proceeding Series. pp. 380-383, 12th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children, IDC 2013, New York, NY, United States, 6/24/13. https://doi.org/10.1145/2485760.2485803
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