Differentiating the biomechanics of normal and diseased cells using isotropically etched silicon microstructures and atomic force microscopy

Mehdi Nikkhah, Jeannine S. Strobl, Masoud Agah

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper reports studying the differential biomechanical properties of HS68 normal human fibroblast cells and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell (as the key cell types in tumour microenvironment [1]) using MEMS-based three dimensional (3-D) silicon microstructures and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). AFM results indicates that the cancer cells have significantly softer cytoskeletal structure (E=0.51±0.35 kPa) compared to normal fibroblast cells (E=1.86±1.13 kPa) supporting our previous observations and explaining the differential adhesion of normal and diseased cells to different compartments of the 3-D silicon microstructures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of Conference, MicroTAS 2009 - The 13th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences
PublisherChemical and Biological Microsystems Society
Pages1805-1807
Number of pages3
ISBN (Print)9780979806421
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009
Externally publishedYes
Event13th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2009 - Jeju, Korea, Republic of
Duration: Nov 1 2009Nov 5 2009

Publication series

NameProceedings of Conference, MicroTAS 2009 - The 13th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences

Other

Other13th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2009
CountryKorea, Republic of
CityJeju
Period11/1/0911/5/09

Keywords

  • AFM
  • Breast cancer
  • Isotropic microchambers
  • MEMS
  • Silicon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering (miscellaneous)
  • Bioengineering

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  • Cite this

    Nikkhah, M., Strobl, J. S., & Agah, M. (2009). Differentiating the biomechanics of normal and diseased cells using isotropically etched silicon microstructures and atomic force microscopy. In Proceedings of Conference, MicroTAS 2009 - The 13th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences (pp. 1805-1807). (Proceedings of Conference, MicroTAS 2009 - The 13th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences). Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society.