Differential stimulation of muscle protein synthesis in elderly humans following isocaloric ingestion of amino acids or whey protein

Douglas Paddon-Jones, Melinda Sheffield-Moore, Christos S. Katsanos, Xiao Jun Zhang, Robert R. Wolfe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

149 Scopus citations

Abstract

To counteract the debilitating progression of sarcopenia, a protein supplement should provide an energetically efficient anabolic stimulus. We quantified net muscle protein synthesis in healthy elderly individuals (65-79 yrs) following ingestion of an isocaloric intact whey protein supplement (WY; n=8) or an essential amino acid supplement (EAA; n=7). Femoral arterio-venous blood samples and vastus lateralis muscle biopsy samples were obtained during a primed, constant infusion of L-[ring-2H5]phenylalanine. Net phenylalanine uptake and mixed muscle fractional synthetic rate (FSR) were calculated during the post-absorptive period and for 3.5 h following ingestion of 15 g EAA or 15 g whey. After accounting for the residual increase in the intracellular phenylalanine pool, net post-prandial phenylalanine uptake was 53.4±9.7 mg phe leg-1 (EAA) and 21.7±4.6 mg phe leg-1 (WY), (P<0.05). Postabsorptive FSR values were 0.056±0.004% h-1 (EAA) and 0.049±0.006% h-1 (WY), (P>0.05). Both supplements stimulated FSR (P<0.05), but the increase was greatest in the EAA group with values of 0.088±0.011% h-1 (EAA) and 0.066±0.004% h-1 (WY), (P<0.05). While both EAA and WY supplements stimulated muscle protein synthesis, EAAs may provide a more energetically efficient nutritional supplement for elderly individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)215-219
Number of pages5
JournalExperimental Gerontology
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Metabolism
  • Nutrition
  • Sarcopenia
  • Supplements

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Aging
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Endocrinology
  • Cell Biology

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