Differential effects of self-monitoring attention, accuracy, and productivity.

J. W. Maag, R. Reid, Samuel DiGangi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Effects of self-monitoring on-task behavior, academic productivity, and academic accuracy were assessed with 6 elementary-school students with learning disabilities in their general education classroom using a mathematics task. Following baseline, the three self-monitoring conditions were introduced using a multiple schedule design during independent practice sessions. Although all three interventions yielded improvements in either arithmetic productivity, accuracy, or on-task behavior, self-monitoring academic productivity or accuracy was generally superior. Differential results were obtained across age groups: fourth graders' mathematics performance improved most when self-monitoring productivity, whereas sixth graders' performance improved most when self-monitoring accuracy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)329-344
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Applied Behavior Analysis
Volume26
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1993

Fingerprint

Mathematics
productivity
monitoring
Learning Disorders
Appointments and Schedules
Age Groups
Students
Education
mathematics
general education
learning disability
performance
elementary school
age group
Self-monitoring
Productivity
classroom
student

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Differential effects of self-monitoring attention, accuracy, and productivity. / Maag, J. W.; Reid, R.; DiGangi, Samuel.

In: Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Vol. 26, No. 3, 09.1993, p. 329-344.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b44af564145a4de7a0f5093db4a51dd2,
title = "Differential effects of self-monitoring attention, accuracy, and productivity.",
abstract = "Effects of self-monitoring on-task behavior, academic productivity, and academic accuracy were assessed with 6 elementary-school students with learning disabilities in their general education classroom using a mathematics task. Following baseline, the three self-monitoring conditions were introduced using a multiple schedule design during independent practice sessions. Although all three interventions yielded improvements in either arithmetic productivity, accuracy, or on-task behavior, self-monitoring academic productivity or accuracy was generally superior. Differential results were obtained across age groups: fourth graders' mathematics performance improved most when self-monitoring productivity, whereas sixth graders' performance improved most when self-monitoring accuracy.",
author = "Maag, {J. W.} and R. Reid and Samuel DiGangi",
year = "1993",
month = "9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "26",
pages = "329--344",
journal = "Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis",
issn = "0021-8855",
publisher = "Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Differential effects of self-monitoring attention, accuracy, and productivity.

AU - Maag, J. W.

AU - Reid, R.

AU - DiGangi, Samuel

PY - 1993/9

Y1 - 1993/9

N2 - Effects of self-monitoring on-task behavior, academic productivity, and academic accuracy were assessed with 6 elementary-school students with learning disabilities in their general education classroom using a mathematics task. Following baseline, the three self-monitoring conditions were introduced using a multiple schedule design during independent practice sessions. Although all three interventions yielded improvements in either arithmetic productivity, accuracy, or on-task behavior, self-monitoring academic productivity or accuracy was generally superior. Differential results were obtained across age groups: fourth graders' mathematics performance improved most when self-monitoring productivity, whereas sixth graders' performance improved most when self-monitoring accuracy.

AB - Effects of self-monitoring on-task behavior, academic productivity, and academic accuracy were assessed with 6 elementary-school students with learning disabilities in their general education classroom using a mathematics task. Following baseline, the three self-monitoring conditions were introduced using a multiple schedule design during independent practice sessions. Although all three interventions yielded improvements in either arithmetic productivity, accuracy, or on-task behavior, self-monitoring academic productivity or accuracy was generally superior. Differential results were obtained across age groups: fourth graders' mathematics performance improved most when self-monitoring productivity, whereas sixth graders' performance improved most when self-monitoring accuracy.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027669380&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027669380&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8407682

AN - SCOPUS:0027669380

VL - 26

SP - 329

EP - 344

JO - Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis

JF - Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis

SN - 0021-8855

IS - 3

ER -