Differential Effects of Parental “drug talk” Styles and Family Communication Environments on Adolescent Substance Use

YoungJu Shin, Michelle Miller-Day, Michael L. Hecht

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current study examines the relationships among adolescent reports of parent–adolescent drug talk styles, family communication environments (e.g., expressiveness, structural traditionalism, and conflict avoidance), and adolescent substance use. ANCOVAs revealed that the 9th grade adolescents (N = 718) engaged in four styles of “drug talks” with parents (e.g., situated direct, ongoing direct, situated indirect, and ongoing indirect style) and these styles differed in their effect on adolescent substance use. Multiple regression analyses showed that expressiveness and structural traditionalism were negatively related to adolescent substance use, whereas conflict avoidance was positively associated with substance use. When controlling for family communication environments and gender, adolescents with an ongoing indirect style reported the lowest use of substance. The findings suggest implications and future directions for theory and practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Communication
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Feb 17 2018

Fingerprint

Communication
adolescent
drug
communication
Pharmaceutical Preparations
conservatism
parents
school grade
Parents
Regression Analysis
regression
gender
Conflict (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication

Cite this

Differential Effects of Parental “drug talk” Styles and Family Communication Environments on Adolescent Substance Use. / Shin, YoungJu; Miller-Day, Michelle; Hecht, Michael L.

In: Health Communication, 17.02.2018, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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