Differential effects of assisted cycling therapy on short-term and working memory of adolescents with Down syndrome

Simon D. Holzapfel, Shannon Ringenbach, Genna M. Mulvey, Amber M. Sandoval-Menendez, Natasha Birchfield, Shreja R. Tahiliani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Persons with Down syndrome (DS) suffer from prefrontal cortex dysfunction and deficits in executive functions. The current study examined the effects assisted cycling therapy (ACT) on short-term (STM) and working memory (WM) in adolescents with DS. During ACT, the cadence of participants on a stationary bicycle was augmented with an electrical motor to 180% of the voluntary cadence. Participants completed eight weeks of ACT (n = 17), eight weeks of voluntary cycling (VC) at their own preferred cadence (n = 16), or eight weeks of no cycling (np ≥.149) and working memory improved only in the ACT group (Hedge’s g = 1.66; p =.003). The results indicate that assisted high-cadence cycling (i.e. ACT) produces superior neural benefits in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex compared to VC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)990-1003
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Cognitive Psychology
Volume28
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 16 2016

Keywords

  • Prefrontal cortex
  • aerobic exercise
  • cortical activation
  • executive function
  • neurotrophic factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

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