Differential competencies contributing to children's comprehension of narrative and expository texts

Rachel M. Best, Randy G. Floyd, Danielle McNamara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

119 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the influences of reading decoding skills and world knowledge on third graders' comprehension of narrative and expository texts. Children read a narrative text and an expository text. Comprehension of each text was assessed with a free recall prompt, three cued recall prompts, and 12 multiple-choice questions. Tests from the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement (Woodcock, McGrew, Mather, 2001) were used to assess reading decoding skills and world knowledge. Comprehension was better for the narrative text than the expository text, and the effects of reader competencies depended on text genre. Comprehension of the narrative text was most influenced by reading decoding skills. In contrast, expository text comprehension was most influenced by world knowledge.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)137-164
Number of pages28
JournalReading Psychology
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

comprehension
narrative
Reading
genre

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Differential competencies contributing to children's comprehension of narrative and expository texts. / Best, Rachel M.; Floyd, Randy G.; McNamara, Danielle.

In: Reading Psychology, Vol. 29, No. 2, 03.2008, p. 137-164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c65b8e0f58e147629683200b3c055d40,
title = "Differential competencies contributing to children's comprehension of narrative and expository texts",
abstract = "This study examined the influences of reading decoding skills and world knowledge on third graders' comprehension of narrative and expository texts. Children read a narrative text and an expository text. Comprehension of each text was assessed with a free recall prompt, three cued recall prompts, and 12 multiple-choice questions. Tests from the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement (Woodcock, McGrew, Mather, 2001) were used to assess reading decoding skills and world knowledge. Comprehension was better for the narrative text than the expository text, and the effects of reader competencies depended on text genre. Comprehension of the narrative text was most influenced by reading decoding skills. In contrast, expository text comprehension was most influenced by world knowledge.",
author = "Best, {Rachel M.} and Floyd, {Randy G.} and Danielle McNamara",
year = "2008",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1080/02702710801963951",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "29",
pages = "137--164",
journal = "Reading Psychology",
issn = "0270-2711",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Differential competencies contributing to children's comprehension of narrative and expository texts

AU - Best, Rachel M.

AU - Floyd, Randy G.

AU - McNamara, Danielle

PY - 2008/3

Y1 - 2008/3

N2 - This study examined the influences of reading decoding skills and world knowledge on third graders' comprehension of narrative and expository texts. Children read a narrative text and an expository text. Comprehension of each text was assessed with a free recall prompt, three cued recall prompts, and 12 multiple-choice questions. Tests from the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement (Woodcock, McGrew, Mather, 2001) were used to assess reading decoding skills and world knowledge. Comprehension was better for the narrative text than the expository text, and the effects of reader competencies depended on text genre. Comprehension of the narrative text was most influenced by reading decoding skills. In contrast, expository text comprehension was most influenced by world knowledge.

AB - This study examined the influences of reading decoding skills and world knowledge on third graders' comprehension of narrative and expository texts. Children read a narrative text and an expository text. Comprehension of each text was assessed with a free recall prompt, three cued recall prompts, and 12 multiple-choice questions. Tests from the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement (Woodcock, McGrew, Mather, 2001) were used to assess reading decoding skills and world knowledge. Comprehension was better for the narrative text than the expository text, and the effects of reader competencies depended on text genre. Comprehension of the narrative text was most influenced by reading decoding skills. In contrast, expository text comprehension was most influenced by world knowledge.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=42049112161&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=42049112161&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/02702710801963951

DO - 10.1080/02702710801963951

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 137

EP - 164

JO - Reading Psychology

JF - Reading Psychology

SN - 0270-2711

IS - 2

ER -