Dielectric beta relaxations in the glassy state of salol?

Hermann Wagner, Ranko Richert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The recently observed possibility to suppress the β-relaxation intensity of o-terphenyl by annealing at temperatures below the glass transition guided us to ask, whether the absence of a dielectric β process in many glass-forming materials, e.g., salol (phenyl salicylate), is a matter of the slow cooling rates usually employed to enter the glassy state. In order to assess this issue, we have quenched liquid salol to well below Tg at a rate of dT/dt = -490 K/min. Opposed to the case of cooling rates around -5 K/min or slower, this highly quenched sample displays a symmetric dielectric relaxation peak near f = 103 Hz with an appreciable relaxation strength, Δ∈ = 6 × 10-3. This novel feature of salol disappears irreversibly after a temperature excursion towards the glass transition at Tg = 220 K.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11660-11663
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Chemical Physics
Volume110
Issue number23
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

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glass
salicylates
cooling
Glass transition
terphenyls
Cooling
Dielectric relaxation
annealing
temperature
Annealing
liquids
Glass
Temperature
phenyl salicylate
Liquids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

Cite this

Dielectric beta relaxations in the glassy state of salol? / Wagner, Hermann; Richert, Ranko.

In: Journal of Chemical Physics, Vol. 110, No. 23, 1999, p. 11660-11663.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wagner, Hermann ; Richert, Ranko. / Dielectric beta relaxations in the glassy state of salol?. In: Journal of Chemical Physics. 1999 ; Vol. 110, No. 23. pp. 11660-11663.
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