Developmental plasticity evolved according to specialist-generalist trade-offs in experimental populations of Drosophila melanogaster

Jacqueline Le Vinh Thuy, John M. VandenBrooks, Michael Angilletta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We studied the evolution of developmental plasticity in populations of Drosophila melanogaster that evolved at either constant or fluctuating temperatures. Consistent with theory, genotypes that evolved at a constant 16°C or 25°C performed best when raised and tested at that temperature. Genotypes that evolved at fluctuating temperatures performed well at either temperature, but only when raised and tested at the same temperature. Our results confirm evolutionary patterns predicted by theory, including a loss of plasticity and a benefit of specialization in constant environments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number20160379
JournalBiology Letters
Volume12
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

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Drosophila melanogaster
Temperature
Population
temperature
Genotype
genotype

Keywords

  • Drosophila
  • Experimental evolution
  • Performance
  • Plasticity
  • Selection
  • Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Developmental plasticity evolved according to specialist-generalist trade-offs in experimental populations of Drosophila melanogaster. / Le Vinh Thuy, Jacqueline; VandenBrooks, John M.; Angilletta, Michael.

In: Biology Letters, Vol. 12, No. 7, 20160379, 01.07.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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