Developmental characteristics of African American and Caribbean Black adolescents' attributions regarding discrimination

Eleanor K. Seaton, Cleopatra H. Caldwell, Robert M. Sellers, James S. Jackson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study examined discrimination attributions in the psychological well-being of Black adolescents. Findings are based on a representative sample of 810 African American and 360 Caribbean Black youth, aged 13-17, who participated in the National Survey of American Life. Youth completed measures of perceived discrimination, discrimination attributions, depressive symptoms, self-esteem, and life satisfaction. Approximately half the youth attributed discrimination to race/ethnicity (43%), followed by age (17%), physical appearance (16.5%), and gender (7.5%), and there were no ethnic, gender, or age differences regarding discrimination attributions. Key findings suggest that the association between perceived discrimination and psychological well-being did not vary according to discrimination attribution, which implies that discrimination is harmful for Black youth regardless of the attribution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)774-788
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Research on Adolescence
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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