Development, testing, and application of a chemistry concept inventory

Stephen Krause, James Birk, Richard Bauer, Brooke Jenkins, Michael J. Pavelich

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A Chemistry Concept Inventory (CCI) has been created that provides linkages to misconceptions observed in chemistry and subsequent introductory materials engineering courses as revealed by a Materials Concept Inventory (MCI). The CCI topics included were bonding, intermolecular forces, electrochemistry, equilibrium, thermochemistry and acids and bases. Numerous students were interviewed in development of questions in order to ascertain that the questions and responses were interpreted as intended. Questioning students on topics of molecular shape gave helpful insight into how students solve problems. For example, a question might be written to test one aspect of the topic, but students might solve it differently. They might use different reasoning that would lead to a correct answer. The item is therefore testing something other than the intended topic. Interviews led to some unique findings in spatial understanding and misconceptions held by these students. Multiple rounds of testing were then used in ascertaining development of a valid Chemistry Concept Inventory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE
Volume1
StatePublished - 2004
Event34th Annual Frontiers in Education: Expanding Educational Opportunities Through Partnerships and Distance Learning - Conference Proceedings, FIE - Savannah, GA, United States
Duration: Oct 20 2004Oct 23 2004

Other

Other34th Annual Frontiers in Education: Expanding Educational Opportunities Through Partnerships and Distance Learning - Conference Proceedings, FIE
CountryUnited States
CitySavannah, GA
Period10/20/0410/23/04

Fingerprint

Students
Testing
Thermochemistry
Electrochemistry
Acids

Keywords

  • Chemistry Concept Inventory
  • Misconceptions
  • Student interviews
  • Validity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Krause, S., Birk, J., Bauer, R., Jenkins, B., & Pavelich, M. J. (2004). Development, testing, and application of a chemistry concept inventory. In Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE (Vol. 1)

Development, testing, and application of a chemistry concept inventory. / Krause, Stephen; Birk, James; Bauer, Richard; Jenkins, Brooke; Pavelich, Michael J.

Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE. Vol. 1 2004.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Krause, S, Birk, J, Bauer, R, Jenkins, B & Pavelich, MJ 2004, Development, testing, and application of a chemistry concept inventory. in Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE. vol. 1, 34th Annual Frontiers in Education: Expanding Educational Opportunities Through Partnerships and Distance Learning - Conference Proceedings, FIE, Savannah, GA, United States, 10/20/04.
Krause S, Birk J, Bauer R, Jenkins B, Pavelich MJ. Development, testing, and application of a chemistry concept inventory. In Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE. Vol. 1. 2004
Krause, Stephen ; Birk, James ; Bauer, Richard ; Jenkins, Brooke ; Pavelich, Michael J. / Development, testing, and application of a chemistry concept inventory. Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE. Vol. 1 2004.
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