Development of reliable modeling methodologies for engine fan blade out containment analysis. Part II

Finite element analysis

Z. Stahlecker, Barzin Mobasher, Subramaniam Rajan, J. M. Pereira

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the first part of the paper [Naik D, Sankaran S, Mobasher B, Rajan SD, Pereira M. Development of reliable modeling methodologies for fan blade-out containment analysis. Part I: experimental studies. Int J Impact Eng, in press], details of the experiments to characterize the behavior of dry fabrics including Kevlar®49, and ballistic tests involving the fabric were presented. In this second part of the paper, we discuss the development and verification of a constitutive model for dry fabrics for use in an explicit finite element program. The developed constitutive model is implemented as a user-defined subroutine in LS-DYNA, a commercial finite element program. It is then used to simulate a suite of ballistic tests [Naik D, Sankaran S, Mobasher B, Rajan SD, Pereira M. Development of reliable modeling methodologies for fan blade-out containment analysis. Part I: experimental studies. Int J Impact Eng, in press] that replicate conditions seen in an engine fan blade out (FBO) event. A qualitative and quantitative comparison of the deformation shape of the fabric containment system and a quantitative comparison of the absorbed energy are carried out. Results indicate that the developed constitutive model provides a very encouraging start in modeling these high-speed events and could provide as Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) desires, an attractive complement to full-scale engine FBO tests.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)447-459
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Impact Engineering
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009

Fingerprint

Fans
Constitutive models
Engines
Finite element method
Ballistics
Subroutines
Aviation
Experiments

Keywords

  • Constitutive modeling
  • Engine fan blade out containment
  • Explicit finite element analysis
  • Fabrics
  • Kevlar
  • Strain-rate effects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Ocean Engineering
  • Automotive Engineering
  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

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abstract = "In the first part of the paper [Naik D, Sankaran S, Mobasher B, Rajan SD, Pereira M. Development of reliable modeling methodologies for fan blade-out containment analysis. Part I: experimental studies. Int J Impact Eng, in press], details of the experiments to characterize the behavior of dry fabrics including Kevlar{\circledR}49, and ballistic tests involving the fabric were presented. In this second part of the paper, we discuss the development and verification of a constitutive model for dry fabrics for use in an explicit finite element program. The developed constitutive model is implemented as a user-defined subroutine in LS-DYNA, a commercial finite element program. It is then used to simulate a suite of ballistic tests [Naik D, Sankaran S, Mobasher B, Rajan SD, Pereira M. Development of reliable modeling methodologies for fan blade-out containment analysis. Part I: experimental studies. Int J Impact Eng, in press] that replicate conditions seen in an engine fan blade out (FBO) event. A qualitative and quantitative comparison of the deformation shape of the fabric containment system and a quantitative comparison of the absorbed energy are carried out. Results indicate that the developed constitutive model provides a very encouraging start in modeling these high-speed events and could provide as Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) desires, an attractive complement to full-scale engine FBO tests.",
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