Development of fusogenic glass surfaces that impart spatiotemporal control over macrophage fusion

Direct visualization of multinucleated giant cell formation

James J. Faust, Wayne Christenson, Kyle Doudrick, Robert Ros, Tatiana Ugarova

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Implantation of synthetic material, including vascular grafts, pacemakers, etc. results in the foreign body reaction and the formation of multinucleated giant cells (MGCs) at the exterior surface of the implant. Despite the long-standing premise that fusion of mononucleated macrophages results in the formation of MGCs, to date, no published study has shown fusion in context with living specimens. This is due to the fact that optical-quality glass, which is required for the majority of live imaging techniques, does not promote macrophage fusion. Consequently, the morphological changes that macrophages undergo during fusion as well as the mechanisms that govern this process remain ill-defined. In this study, we serendipitously identified a highly fusogenic glass surface and discovered that the capacity to promote fusion was due to oleamide contamination. When adsorbed on glass, oleamide and other molecules that contain long-chain hydrocarbons promoted high levels of macrophage fusion. Adhesion, an essential step for macrophage fusion, was apparently mediated by Mac-1 integrin (CD11b/CD18, αMβ2) as determined by single cell force spectroscopy and adhesion assays. Micropatterned glass further increased fusion and enabled a remarkable degree of spatiotemporal control over MGC formation. Using these surfaces, we reveal the kinetics that govern MGC formation in vitro. We anticipate that the spatiotemporal control afforded by these surfaces will expedite studies designed to identify the mechanism(s) of macrophage fusion and MGC formation with implication for the design of novel biomaterials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)160-171
Number of pages12
JournalBiomaterials
Volume128
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Fingerprint

Macrophages
Giant Cells
Glass
Fusion reactions
Visualization
Foreign-Body Reaction
Biocompatible Materials
Adhesion
Hydrocarbons
Integrins
Blood Vessels
Optical glass
Pacemakers
Spectrum Analysis
Transplants
Biomaterials
Grafts
Assays
Contamination
Spectroscopy

Keywords

  • Foreign body reaction
  • Live imaging
  • Mac-1 integrin
  • Macrophage fusion
  • Microscopy
  • Multinucleated giant cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Biophysics
  • Biomaterials
  • Mechanics of Materials

Cite this

Development of fusogenic glass surfaces that impart spatiotemporal control over macrophage fusion : Direct visualization of multinucleated giant cell formation. / Faust, James J.; Christenson, Wayne; Doudrick, Kyle; Ros, Robert; Ugarova, Tatiana.

In: Biomaterials, Vol. 128, 01.06.2017, p. 160-171.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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