Development of a Values Conflict Resolution Assessment

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The values clarification and decision-making literature lacks a standardized instrument that can assess the extent to which an individual is resolved about a specific values conflict. In this article, the development of a Values Conflict Resolution Assessment (VCRA) is described, and results of preliminary validation and reliability studies are reported. VCRA questionnaire items were constructed from theoretical criteria found in values clarification, decision-making, and related literature. Factor analyses and judges' ratings suggested that being resolved consists mainly of "ethical-emotional" and "rational-behavioral" components. The scales exhibited internal consistency and temporal stability. In one test of validity, the VCRA discriminated between subject-identified easy and difficult values conflicts. Also, VCRA scores correlated negatively with conflict-related anxiety and positively with self-reports of conflict resolution and self-esteem, as predicted. Uses of the VCRA in research and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-37
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Counseling Psychology
Volume34
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1987

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Negotiating
Decision Making
Validation Studies
Self Concept
Self Report
Statistical Factor Analysis
Anxiety
Research
Conflict (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Development of a Values Conflict Resolution Assessment. / Kinnier, Richard.

In: Journal of Counseling Psychology, Vol. 34, No. 1, 01.1987, p. 31-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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