Development and validation of educational materials for food allergy

Scott H. Sicherer, Perla Vargas, Marion E. Groetch, Lynn Christie, Suzanne K. Carlisle, Sally Noone, Stacie M. Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To develop and validate a food allergy educational program. Study design: Materials developed through focus groups and parental and expert review were submitted to 60 parents of newly referred children with a prior food allergy diagnosis and an epinephrine autoinjector. The main outcome was correct demonstration of an autoinjector. Results: The correct number of autoinjector activation steps increased from 3.4 to 5.95 (of 6) after training (P < .001) and was 5.47 at 1 year (P <.05). The mean score for comfort with using the autoinjector (7-point Likert scale) before the curriculum was 4.63 (somewhat comfortable) and increased to 6.23 after the intervention (P <.05) and remained elevated at 1 year (6.03). Knowledge tests (maximum 15) increased from a mean score of 9.2 to 12.4 (P <.001) at the initial visit and remained at 12.7 at 1 year. The annualized rate of allergic reactions fell from 1.77 (historical) the year prior, to 0.42 (P <.001) after the program. On a 7-point Likert scale, all satisfaction categories remained above a favorable mean score of 6: straight-forward, organized, interesting, relevant, and recommend to others. Conclusions: This food allergy educational curriculum for parents, now available online at no cost, showed high levels of satisfaction and efficacy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)651-656
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume160
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012

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Food Hypersensitivity
Curriculum
Parents
Focus Groups
Epinephrine
Hypersensitivity
Costs and Cost Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Sicherer, S. H., Vargas, P., Groetch, M. E., Christie, L., Carlisle, S. K., Noone, S., & Jones, S. M. (2012). Development and validation of educational materials for food allergy. Journal of Pediatrics, 160(4), 651-656. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2011.09.056

Development and validation of educational materials for food allergy. / Sicherer, Scott H.; Vargas, Perla; Groetch, Marion E.; Christie, Lynn; Carlisle, Suzanne K.; Noone, Sally; Jones, Stacie M.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 160, No. 4, 04.2012, p. 651-656.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sicherer, SH, Vargas, P, Groetch, ME, Christie, L, Carlisle, SK, Noone, S & Jones, SM 2012, 'Development and validation of educational materials for food allergy', Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 160, no. 4, pp. 651-656. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2011.09.056
Sicherer, Scott H. ; Vargas, Perla ; Groetch, Marion E. ; Christie, Lynn ; Carlisle, Suzanne K. ; Noone, Sally ; Jones, Stacie M. / Development and validation of educational materials for food allergy. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 2012 ; Vol. 160, No. 4. pp. 651-656.
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