Development and evolution of urban infrastructure in response to historical extreme events

Samuel A. Markolf, Mikhail Chester

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Events like Hurricane Katrina and Superstorm Sandy illustrate the devastating affect that extreme events can have on built infrastructure. However, less is known about how extreme events shape the design of infrastructure in the long-run. With this in mind, we use a combination of quantitative (SHELDUS and NOAA storm events databases) and qualitative (books and media coverage) data to catalog and evaluate historical extreme events from 1950 to 2017 for the Phoenix, New York City, and Miami in order to gain a better understanding of the influence that extreme weather events might have on infrastructure. Preliminary results indicate that extreme weather does appear to have an influence on the design, development, and management of infrastructure. Flooding appears to be primary driver of the more substantial/dramatic changes to infrastructure. However, in many cases, the SHELDUS/NOAA data indicates that flooding has neither been the most deadly nor most costly hazard.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationInternational Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2017
Subtitle of host publicationPolicy, Finance, and Education - Proceedings of the International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2017
PublisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
Pages96-105
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9780784481202
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
Event2017 International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure: Policy, Finance, and Education, ICSI 2017 - New York, United States
Duration: Oct 26 2017Oct 28 2017

Other

Other2017 International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure: Policy, Finance, and Education, ICSI 2017
CountryUnited States
CityNew York
Period10/26/1710/28/17

Fingerprint

Hurricanes
Hazards
Urban infrastructure
Extreme events
Flooding
Weather
Data base
Media coverage
Hazard
Hurricane Katrina
Design and development

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Management of Technology and Innovation
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment

Cite this

Markolf, S. A., & Chester, M. (2017). Development and evolution of urban infrastructure in response to historical extreme events. In International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2017: Policy, Finance, and Education - Proceedings of the International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2017 (pp. 96-105). American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784481202.010

Development and evolution of urban infrastructure in response to historical extreme events. / Markolf, Samuel A.; Chester, Mikhail.

International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2017: Policy, Finance, and Education - Proceedings of the International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2017. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2017. p. 96-105.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Markolf, SA & Chester, M 2017, Development and evolution of urban infrastructure in response to historical extreme events. in International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2017: Policy, Finance, and Education - Proceedings of the International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2017. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), pp. 96-105, 2017 International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure: Policy, Finance, and Education, ICSI 2017, New York, United States, 10/26/17. https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784481202.010
Markolf SA, Chester M. Development and evolution of urban infrastructure in response to historical extreme events. In International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2017: Policy, Finance, and Education - Proceedings of the International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2017. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). 2017. p. 96-105 https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784481202.010
Markolf, Samuel A. ; Chester, Mikhail. / Development and evolution of urban infrastructure in response to historical extreme events. International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2017: Policy, Finance, and Education - Proceedings of the International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure 2017. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2017. pp. 96-105
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