Development and characterization of a Marek's disease transplantable tumor in inbred line 72 chickens homozygous at the major (B) histocompatibility locus.

E. A. Stephens, R. L. Witter, K. Nazerian, J. M. Sharma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

A serially transplantable Marek's disease (MD) tumor, designated MDCT-RP-3, was developed from an MD-virus-induced lymphoma (GA strain) in a pedigreed female chicken of the inbred B-histocompatible (B2/B2), line 72, and is the first MD tumor transplant to be developed in chickens both syngeneic and selected for susceptibility to MD. The MDCT-RP-3 tumor maintained its female karyotype through at least 80 passages in male 72 chickens. High doses of tumor cells caused progressively growing tumors at 5 days postinoculation and death of young 72 chicks in 7-10 days, whereas allogeneic chicks of other lines were less susceptible. Tumors frequently regressed when doses of tumor cells were low or older chickens were used. MD virus was rescued from MDCT-RP-3 cells in cell culture, and chickens surviving the early transplant response sometimes developed MD lymphomas. The tumor cells expressed MD-tumor-associated surface antigen (MATSA) and T-cell surface antigens. A serum raised in rabbits against MDCT-RP-3 cells and absorbed with normal 72 cells appeared to be reactive against MATSA on all MD tumor cells tested and is probably monospecific. Sera raised against MDCT-RP-3 in chickens also contained MATSA antibodies reactive against heterologous but not homologous MD tumor cells. Protection against transplantation of MDCT-RP-3 cells was not afforded by immunization with turkey herpesvirus vaccine. Some unvaccinated chickens that regressed MDCT-RP-3 transplant appeared to be partially immune to later development of MD lymphomas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)358-374
Number of pages17
JournalAvian diseases
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1980

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Animals
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

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