Developing comprehensive, integrated, three-tiered models to prevent and manage learning and behavior problems

Kathleen Lynne Lane, Wendy Oakes, Holly Mariah Menzies, Pamela Harris

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

When administrators, 1 teachers, and other school personnel are asked to define what it means for a student to have an emotional or behavioral disorder (EBD), the first images and thoughts are often reflective of externalizing behaviors. These specific behaviors include verbal and physical aggression, noncompliance, bullying, and coercive behaviors (Lane et al. in press b; Walker et al. 2004). It is not surprising that educators focus on these dimensions of EBD, as these behaviors clearly impede the instructional process for many teachers and interrupt the learning experiences of all students (Lane 2007). Yet, the construct of EBD also includes students with internalizing behaviors with characteristics such as anxiety, social withdrawal, depression, and somatic complaints (Achenbach 1991). Although internalizing behaviors are often less recognized as they tend not to impede instruction, they are no less important, as they have serious negative implications for the students who suffer from them (Crick et al. 2002; Morris et al. 2002).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Routledge International Companion to Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages177-183
Number of pages7
ISBN (Electronic)9781136303111
ISBN (Print)9780415584630
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Lane, K. L., Oakes, W., Menzies, H. M., & Harris, P. (2012). Developing comprehensive, integrated, three-tiered models to prevent and manage learning and behavior problems. In The Routledge International Companion to Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties (pp. 177-183). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203117378