Developing and Testing a Theoretical Framework for Computer-Mediated Transparency of Local Governments

Stephan G. Grimmelikhuijsen, Eric Welch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

87 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article contributes to the emerging literature on transparency by developing and empirically testing a theoretical framework that explains the determinants of local government Web site transparency. It aims to answer the following central question: What institutional factors determine the different dimensions of government transparency? The framework distinguishes three dimensions of transparency-decision making transparency, policy information transparency, and policy outcome transparency-and hypothesizes three explanations for each: organizational capacity, political influence, and group influence on government. Results indicate that each dimension of transparency is associated with different factors. Decision-making transparency is associated with political influence; when left-wing parties are strong in the local council, local government tends to be more transparent. Policy information transparency is associated with media attention and external group pressure, and policy outcome transparency is associated with both external group pressure and the organizational capacity. The authors discuss the implications for policy and administration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)562-571
Number of pages10
JournalPublic Administration Review
Volume72
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012
Externally publishedYes

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transparency
pressure group
information policy
political influence
Testing
Theoretical framework
Local government
Transparency
decision making
political group
institutional factors
determinants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration
  • Marketing

Cite this

Developing and Testing a Theoretical Framework for Computer-Mediated Transparency of Local Governments. / Grimmelikhuijsen, Stephan G.; Welch, Eric.

In: Public Administration Review, Vol. 72, No. 4, 07.2012, p. 562-571.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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