Determinants of co-operative patronage in Alberta

Kurt K. Klein, Timothy Richards, Allan Walburger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Co-operative managers face an increasingly heterogeneous pool of potential members. Because these members bring a variety of economic and noneconomic demands to their co-operative, managers must know how different member characteristics and performance perceptions influence their decision to patronize a co-operative. This study applies three models of co-operative patronage to survey data from rural Alberta. A Poisson regression is used to determine the factors that explain the number of co-operatives used, while an index of co-operative patronage measures the relative intensity of co-operative versus proprietary firm usage. A third model contucts a Tobit analysis of the amount of business conducted with each of several different types of co-operatives. The results show that older farmers tend to partonize more co-operatives, and larger farms do a greater share of their business with co-operatives than do smaller fiarms. Farmers who believe co-operatives offer innovative products and services are more likely to patronize them, while a belief that co-operatives should play an active role in noneconomic matters is not important.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-110
Number of pages18
JournalCanadian Journal of Agricultural Economics
Volume45
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jul 1997

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Alberta
managers
farmers
large farms
Economics
farm
economics
Farmers
Patronage
Farms
Surveys and Questionnaires
decision
demand
firm
analysis
index
product
services

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Determinants of co-operative patronage in Alberta. / Klein, Kurt K.; Richards, Timothy; Walburger, Allan.

In: Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics, Vol. 45, No. 2, 07.1997, p. 93-110.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Klein, Kurt K. ; Richards, Timothy ; Walburger, Allan. / Determinants of co-operative patronage in Alberta. In: Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics. 1997 ; Vol. 45, No. 2. pp. 93-110.
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