Detection of water in the LCROSS ejecta plume

Anthony Colaprete, Peter Schultz, Jennifer Heldmann, Diane Wooden, Mark Shirley, Kimberly Ennico, Brendan Hermalyn, William Marshall, Antonio Ricco, Richard C. Elphic, David Goldstein, Dustin Summy, Gwendolyn D. Bart, Erik Asphaug, Don Korycansky, David Landis, Luke Sollitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

354 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several remote observations have indicated that water ice may be presented in permanently shadowed craters of the Moon. The Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission was designed to provide direct evidence (1). On 9 October 2009, a spent Centaur rocket struck the persistently shadowed region within the lunar south pole crater Cabeus, ejecting debris, dust, and vapor. This material was observed by a second "shepherding" spacecraft, which carried nine instruments, including cameras, spectrometers, and a radiometer. Near-infrared absorbance attributed to water vapor and ice and ultraviolet emissions attributable to hydroxyl radicals support the presence of water in the debris. The maximum total water vapor and water ice within the instrument field of view was 155 ± 12 kilograms. Given the estimated total excavated mass of regolith that reached sunlight, and hence was observable, the concentration of water ice in the regolith at the LCROSS impact site is estimated to be 5.6 ± 2.9% by mass. In addition to water, spectral bands of a number of other volatile compounds were observed, including light hydrocarbons, sulfur-bearing species, and carbon dioxide.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)463-468
Number of pages6
JournalScience
Volume330
Issue number6003
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 22 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ice
Observation
Water
Steam
Spacecraft
Sunlight
Hydrocarbons
Dust
Sulfur
Carbon Dioxide
Hydroxyl Radical
Light

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Colaprete, A., Schultz, P., Heldmann, J., Wooden, D., Shirley, M., Ennico, K., ... Sollitt, L. (2010). Detection of water in the LCROSS ejecta plume. Science, 330(6003), 463-468. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1186986

Detection of water in the LCROSS ejecta plume. / Colaprete, Anthony; Schultz, Peter; Heldmann, Jennifer; Wooden, Diane; Shirley, Mark; Ennico, Kimberly; Hermalyn, Brendan; Marshall, William; Ricco, Antonio; Elphic, Richard C.; Goldstein, David; Summy, Dustin; Bart, Gwendolyn D.; Asphaug, Erik; Korycansky, Don; Landis, David; Sollitt, Luke.

In: Science, Vol. 330, No. 6003, 22.10.2010, p. 463-468.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Colaprete, A, Schultz, P, Heldmann, J, Wooden, D, Shirley, M, Ennico, K, Hermalyn, B, Marshall, W, Ricco, A, Elphic, RC, Goldstein, D, Summy, D, Bart, GD, Asphaug, E, Korycansky, D, Landis, D & Sollitt, L 2010, 'Detection of water in the LCROSS ejecta plume', Science, vol. 330, no. 6003, pp. 463-468. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1186986
Colaprete A, Schultz P, Heldmann J, Wooden D, Shirley M, Ennico K et al. Detection of water in the LCROSS ejecta plume. Science. 2010 Oct 22;330(6003):463-468. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1186986
Colaprete, Anthony ; Schultz, Peter ; Heldmann, Jennifer ; Wooden, Diane ; Shirley, Mark ; Ennico, Kimberly ; Hermalyn, Brendan ; Marshall, William ; Ricco, Antonio ; Elphic, Richard C. ; Goldstein, David ; Summy, Dustin ; Bart, Gwendolyn D. ; Asphaug, Erik ; Korycansky, Don ; Landis, David ; Sollitt, Luke. / Detection of water in the LCROSS ejecta plume. In: Science. 2010 ; Vol. 330, No. 6003. pp. 463-468.
@article{7d87210dbcf14d6aa23529362166181e,
title = "Detection of water in the LCROSS ejecta plume",
abstract = "Several remote observations have indicated that water ice may be presented in permanently shadowed craters of the Moon. The Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission was designed to provide direct evidence (1). On 9 October 2009, a spent Centaur rocket struck the persistently shadowed region within the lunar south pole crater Cabeus, ejecting debris, dust, and vapor. This material was observed by a second {"}shepherding{"} spacecraft, which carried nine instruments, including cameras, spectrometers, and a radiometer. Near-infrared absorbance attributed to water vapor and ice and ultraviolet emissions attributable to hydroxyl radicals support the presence of water in the debris. The maximum total water vapor and water ice within the instrument field of view was 155 ± 12 kilograms. Given the estimated total excavated mass of regolith that reached sunlight, and hence was observable, the concentration of water ice in the regolith at the LCROSS impact site is estimated to be 5.6 ± 2.9{\%} by mass. In addition to water, spectral bands of a number of other volatile compounds were observed, including light hydrocarbons, sulfur-bearing species, and carbon dioxide.",
author = "Anthony Colaprete and Peter Schultz and Jennifer Heldmann and Diane Wooden and Mark Shirley and Kimberly Ennico and Brendan Hermalyn and William Marshall and Antonio Ricco and Elphic, {Richard C.} and David Goldstein and Dustin Summy and Bart, {Gwendolyn D.} and Erik Asphaug and Don Korycansky and David Landis and Luke Sollitt",
year = "2010",
month = "10",
day = "22",
doi = "10.1126/science.1186986",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "330",
pages = "463--468",
journal = "Science",
issn = "0036-8075",
publisher = "American Association for the Advancement of Science",
number = "6003",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Detection of water in the LCROSS ejecta plume

AU - Colaprete, Anthony

AU - Schultz, Peter

AU - Heldmann, Jennifer

AU - Wooden, Diane

AU - Shirley, Mark

AU - Ennico, Kimberly

AU - Hermalyn, Brendan

AU - Marshall, William

AU - Ricco, Antonio

AU - Elphic, Richard C.

AU - Goldstein, David

AU - Summy, Dustin

AU - Bart, Gwendolyn D.

AU - Asphaug, Erik

AU - Korycansky, Don

AU - Landis, David

AU - Sollitt, Luke

PY - 2010/10/22

Y1 - 2010/10/22

N2 - Several remote observations have indicated that water ice may be presented in permanently shadowed craters of the Moon. The Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission was designed to provide direct evidence (1). On 9 October 2009, a spent Centaur rocket struck the persistently shadowed region within the lunar south pole crater Cabeus, ejecting debris, dust, and vapor. This material was observed by a second "shepherding" spacecraft, which carried nine instruments, including cameras, spectrometers, and a radiometer. Near-infrared absorbance attributed to water vapor and ice and ultraviolet emissions attributable to hydroxyl radicals support the presence of water in the debris. The maximum total water vapor and water ice within the instrument field of view was 155 ± 12 kilograms. Given the estimated total excavated mass of regolith that reached sunlight, and hence was observable, the concentration of water ice in the regolith at the LCROSS impact site is estimated to be 5.6 ± 2.9% by mass. In addition to water, spectral bands of a number of other volatile compounds were observed, including light hydrocarbons, sulfur-bearing species, and carbon dioxide.

AB - Several remote observations have indicated that water ice may be presented in permanently shadowed craters of the Moon. The Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission was designed to provide direct evidence (1). On 9 October 2009, a spent Centaur rocket struck the persistently shadowed region within the lunar south pole crater Cabeus, ejecting debris, dust, and vapor. This material was observed by a second "shepherding" spacecraft, which carried nine instruments, including cameras, spectrometers, and a radiometer. Near-infrared absorbance attributed to water vapor and ice and ultraviolet emissions attributable to hydroxyl radicals support the presence of water in the debris. The maximum total water vapor and water ice within the instrument field of view was 155 ± 12 kilograms. Given the estimated total excavated mass of regolith that reached sunlight, and hence was observable, the concentration of water ice in the regolith at the LCROSS impact site is estimated to be 5.6 ± 2.9% by mass. In addition to water, spectral bands of a number of other volatile compounds were observed, including light hydrocarbons, sulfur-bearing species, and carbon dioxide.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77958160214&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77958160214&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1126/science.1186986

DO - 10.1126/science.1186986

M3 - Article

VL - 330

SP - 463

EP - 468

JO - Science

JF - Science

SN - 0036-8075

IS - 6003

ER -