Detecting cancer gene networks characterized by recurrent genomic alterations in a population

Sol Efroni, Rotem Ben-Hamo, Michael Edmonson, Sharon Greenblum, Carl F. Schaefer, Kenneth Buetow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High resolution, system-wide characterizations have demonstrated the capacity to identify genomic regions that undergo genomic aberrations. Such research efforts often aim at associating these regions with disease etiology and outcome. Identifying the corresponding biologic processes that are responsible for disease and its outcome remains challenging. Using novel analytic methods that utilize the structure of biologic networks, we are able to identify the specific networks that are highly significantly, nonrandomly altered by regions of copy number amplification observed in a systems-wide analysis. We demonstrate this method in breast cancer, where the state of a subset of the pathways identified through these regions is shown to be highly associated with disease survival and recurrence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere14437
JournalPLoS One
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Gene Regulatory Networks
Neoplasm Genes
Genes
genomics
neoplasms
breast neoplasms
Population
etiology
Aberrations
Amplification
methodology
Breast Neoplasms
Recurrence
Research
gene regulatory networks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Detecting cancer gene networks characterized by recurrent genomic alterations in a population. / Efroni, Sol; Ben-Hamo, Rotem; Edmonson, Michael; Greenblum, Sharon; Schaefer, Carl F.; Buetow, Kenneth.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 6, No. 1, e14437, 2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Efroni, Sol ; Ben-Hamo, Rotem ; Edmonson, Michael ; Greenblum, Sharon ; Schaefer, Carl F. ; Buetow, Kenneth. / Detecting cancer gene networks characterized by recurrent genomic alterations in a population. In: PLoS One. 2011 ; Vol. 6, No. 1.
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