Destroyed by Love: nation, memory, and humanity in South Asia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Remembered experiences of violence, humiliation, and loss suffered in the 1971 war of Bangladesh offer a site for writing a new contemporary history in South Asia. Love, not for humanity but for nation, in survivors' memories was the site of violence in the war. The state's history-writing project cultivated hate against neighbors deemed enemies and encouraged violence against them. More than four decades later, the awareness of intersubjective relationships leads survivors—victims and perpetrators—to search for meaning beyond their national labels. The quest leads to the renewal of insāniyat, a South Asian concept of humanity, which survivors suggest is the site of human freedom from violence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalWomen's History Review
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Oct 20 2015

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South Asia
love
violence
contemporary history
hate
Bangladesh
history
experience
Survivors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Gender Studies

Cite this

Destroyed by Love : nation, memory, and humanity in South Asia. / Saikia, Yasmin.

In: Women's History Review, 20.10.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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