Designing successful participatory platforms with a public intent: Lessons learned from practitioners, scholars, and citizen participants

Chase Treisman, Tanya M. Kelley, Erik Johnston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Public organizations have interacted with citizens through increasingly sophisticated internet-enabled technology. Participatory platforms emerged from Web 2.0 technologies in the mid-2000s as a governance mechanism to engage citizens in the process of effecting social change. Although the potential of platforms is recognized, its successful implementation has faced challenges. To begin to get a handle on how to best design and manage participatory platforms, we conducted an exploratory participatory action research study grounded in two events - The Policy Challenge and NSF Workshop on Participatory Platforms with a Public Intent. Both events communed practitioners, scholars, and citizen participants with diverse experience and expertise conducting and researching platforms. The insights expressed through the events and follow-up interviews and online survey informed our development of a participatory platform lifecycle and design framework to assist designing successful participatory platforms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)479-513
Number of pages35
JournalInternational Journal of Organization Theory and Behavior
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Public Administration
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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