Abstract

Richard Thiel, Edward Kavazanjian Jr., and Xuan Wu present the design considerations for slip interfaces on steep-wall liner. In the design of steep slope lining systems, the authors believe it is necessary to be able to accommodate down-drag without incurring any damage to the primary liner system. Furthermore, tension in liner system elements, and in particular in the geomembrane component of a liner system, should be minimized. Protection of a steep-slope liner against down-drag damage can be accomplished in two ways. One method is to provide one or more preferential slip surfaces above the primary liner. The design approach suggested by the authors to safely mitigate the potential for undesirable shearing and tension of the primary geomembrane is to introduce a slip element underlain by a high strength geotextile that would be anchored on the intermediate benches of the side slope and extend partway down the slope. The design concept of using a slip interface in conjunction with a high-strength geotextile to accommodate down-drag is a feasible design methodology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalGeosynthetics
Volume33
Issue number1
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

Fingerprint

liner
Geomembranes
Drag
Geotextiles
drag
geomembrane
geotextile
damage
Linings
Shearing
methodology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology
  • Polymers and Plastics

Cite this

Design considerations for slip interfaces on steepwall liner systems. / Thiel, Richard; Kavazanjian, Edward; Wu, Xuan.

In: Geosynthetics, Vol. 33, No. 1, 01.02.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{fbf2a655b6484a128c18e294e838a927,
title = "Design considerations for slip interfaces on steepwall liner systems",
abstract = "Richard Thiel, Edward Kavazanjian Jr., and Xuan Wu present the design considerations for slip interfaces on steep-wall liner. In the design of steep slope lining systems, the authors believe it is necessary to be able to accommodate down-drag without incurring any damage to the primary liner system. Furthermore, tension in liner system elements, and in particular in the geomembrane component of a liner system, should be minimized. Protection of a steep-slope liner against down-drag damage can be accomplished in two ways. One method is to provide one or more preferential slip surfaces above the primary liner. The design approach suggested by the authors to safely mitigate the potential for undesirable shearing and tension of the primary geomembrane is to introduce a slip element underlain by a high strength geotextile that would be anchored on the intermediate benches of the side slope and extend partway down the slope. The design concept of using a slip interface in conjunction with a high-strength geotextile to accommodate down-drag is a feasible design methodology.",
author = "Richard Thiel and Edward Kavazanjian and Xuan Wu",
year = "2015",
month = "2",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "33",
journal = "Geosynthetics",
issn = "1931-8189",
publisher = "Industrial Fabrics Association International",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Design considerations for slip interfaces on steepwall liner systems

AU - Thiel, Richard

AU - Kavazanjian, Edward

AU - Wu, Xuan

PY - 2015/2/1

Y1 - 2015/2/1

N2 - Richard Thiel, Edward Kavazanjian Jr., and Xuan Wu present the design considerations for slip interfaces on steep-wall liner. In the design of steep slope lining systems, the authors believe it is necessary to be able to accommodate down-drag without incurring any damage to the primary liner system. Furthermore, tension in liner system elements, and in particular in the geomembrane component of a liner system, should be minimized. Protection of a steep-slope liner against down-drag damage can be accomplished in two ways. One method is to provide one or more preferential slip surfaces above the primary liner. The design approach suggested by the authors to safely mitigate the potential for undesirable shearing and tension of the primary geomembrane is to introduce a slip element underlain by a high strength geotextile that would be anchored on the intermediate benches of the side slope and extend partway down the slope. The design concept of using a slip interface in conjunction with a high-strength geotextile to accommodate down-drag is a feasible design methodology.

AB - Richard Thiel, Edward Kavazanjian Jr., and Xuan Wu present the design considerations for slip interfaces on steep-wall liner. In the design of steep slope lining systems, the authors believe it is necessary to be able to accommodate down-drag without incurring any damage to the primary liner system. Furthermore, tension in liner system elements, and in particular in the geomembrane component of a liner system, should be minimized. Protection of a steep-slope liner against down-drag damage can be accomplished in two ways. One method is to provide one or more preferential slip surfaces above the primary liner. The design approach suggested by the authors to safely mitigate the potential for undesirable shearing and tension of the primary geomembrane is to introduce a slip element underlain by a high strength geotextile that would be anchored on the intermediate benches of the side slope and extend partway down the slope. The design concept of using a slip interface in conjunction with a high-strength geotextile to accommodate down-drag is a feasible design methodology.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84922346218&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84922346218&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84922346218

VL - 33

JO - Geosynthetics

JF - Geosynthetics

SN - 1931-8189

IS - 1

ER -