Design and implementation of functional nanoelectronic interfaces with biomolecules, cells, and tissue using nanowire device arrays

Brian P. Timko, Tzahi Cohen-Karni, Quan Qing, Bozhi Tian, Charles M. Lieber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

93 Scopus citations

Abstract

Nanowire FETs (NWFETs) are promising building blocks for nanoscale bioelectronic interfaces with cells and tissue since they are known to exhibit exquisite sensitivity in the context of chemical and biological detection, and have the potential to form strongly coupled interfaces with cell membranes. We present a general scheme that can be used to assemble NWs with rationally designed composition and geometry on either planar inorganic or biocompatible flexible plastic surfaces. We demonstrate that these devices can be used to measure signals from neurons, cardiomyocytes, and heart tissue. Reported signals are in millivolts range, which are equal to or substantially greater than those recorded with either planar FETs or multielectrode arrays, and demonstrate one unique advantage of NW-based devices. Basic studies showing the effect of device sensitivity and cell/substrate junction quality on signal magnitude are presented. Finally, our demonstrated ability to design high-density arrays of NWFETs enables us to map signal at the subcellular level, a functionality not enabled by conventional microfabricated devices. These advances could have broad applications in high-throughput drug assays, fundamental biophysical studies of cellular function, and development of powerful prosthetics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number5233892
Pages (from-to)269-280
Number of pages12
JournalIEEE Transactions on Nanotechnology
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cancer markers
  • Cardiomyocyte
  • Heart
  • Nanowire (NW) transistor
  • Neuron
  • Silicon
  • Virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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