Design and fabrication of a containerized micro-grid for disaster relief and off-grid applications

Samantha Janko, Shaun Atkinson, Nathan Johnson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Rapid solutions are needed throughout the world to meet electrical demands for disaster relief, stabilizing development, industrial or research centers, exploratory drilling and mining, military stationing, and other off-grid or weak-grid applications. This need for on-demand power requires a mobile, modular, and self-sufficient power system designed for rapid deployment and seamless integration. This paper describes a mobile power solution specifically designed for disaster response situations like the Haiti earthquake in 2010, the primary motivating case for this work. A public-private partnership between Arizona State University and NRG Energy was formed to complete the use-inspired design. The mobile system was scoped to meet electricity requirements for a command center, clinic, cellular communications, kitchen, short-term lodging and public lighting, and other critical loads needed to stabilize development in the wake of natural or anthropogenic disaster that destroys the local electrical infrastructure. Deploying modular and self-contained microgrids has the potential to reduce human harm following disaster by providing a decentralized network of electrical generation assets designed to meet critical loads for human survival and well being. In addition, since no two emergency situations are alike, the proposed solution provides flexibility and scalability to meet constraints for local renewable resources, fuel availability, and physical deployment space. The final system includes a 20 kW solar photovoltaic (PV) array, 10 kWh of lithium-ion battery storage, a 10 kW inverter system, a control computer, and a 20 kW diesel generator for supplemental power. The solar array is packed within a 20' steel shipping container for ease and safe transport, thereby making the solution "containerized." Components must be firmly mounted or secured to the walls and floors of the container for transport via a cargo freighter or helicopter. A second room was created inside the container to separate the generator from the batteries for safety purposes. The prototype can be fully deployed and functional in less than one hour's time, and was tested against a load bank during various times of the day to illustrate how the power system controls shift operation between batteries, solar PV, and the generator. Sustainability, ethics, health, and safety features were considered in relation to the design specifications, manufacturability, and design scalability. These considerations included the lifecycle of the container, maintenance, modularity, intuitive operation, accessibility, and component temperature regulation, among others. Integration of other technologies such as wind power generation and water purification have the potential to bring further benefit through the plug-and-play containerized micro-grid solution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication42nd Design Automation Conference
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
Volume2A-2016
ISBN (Electronic)9780791850107
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016
EventASME 2016 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2016 - Charlotte, United States
Duration: Aug 21 2016Aug 24 2016

Other

OtherASME 2016 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2016
CountryUnited States
CityCharlotte
Period8/21/168/24/16

Fingerprint

Microgrid
Disaster
Container
Disasters
Fabrication
Containers
Grid
Critical Load
Generator
Battery
Power System
Scalability
Safety
Lithium-ion Battery
Renewable Resources
Wind Power
Alike
Mobile Systems
Helicopter
Drilling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Modeling and Simulation

Cite this

Janko, S., Atkinson, S., & Johnson, N. (2016). Design and fabrication of a containerized micro-grid for disaster relief and off-grid applications. In 42nd Design Automation Conference (Vol. 2A-2016). American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2016-60296

Design and fabrication of a containerized micro-grid for disaster relief and off-grid applications. / Janko, Samantha; Atkinson, Shaun; Johnson, Nathan.

42nd Design Automation Conference. Vol. 2A-2016 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2016.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Janko, S, Atkinson, S & Johnson, N 2016, Design and fabrication of a containerized micro-grid for disaster relief and off-grid applications. in 42nd Design Automation Conference. vol. 2A-2016, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), ASME 2016 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2016, Charlotte, United States, 8/21/16. https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2016-60296
Janko S, Atkinson S, Johnson N. Design and fabrication of a containerized micro-grid for disaster relief and off-grid applications. In 42nd Design Automation Conference. Vol. 2A-2016. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). 2016 https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2016-60296
Janko, Samantha ; Atkinson, Shaun ; Johnson, Nathan. / Design and fabrication of a containerized micro-grid for disaster relief and off-grid applications. 42nd Design Automation Conference. Vol. 2A-2016 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2016.
@inproceedings{bca9708fe7754a8cbf905b3e8c45fbdf,
title = "Design and fabrication of a containerized micro-grid for disaster relief and off-grid applications",
abstract = "Rapid solutions are needed throughout the world to meet electrical demands for disaster relief, stabilizing development, industrial or research centers, exploratory drilling and mining, military stationing, and other off-grid or weak-grid applications. This need for on-demand power requires a mobile, modular, and self-sufficient power system designed for rapid deployment and seamless integration. This paper describes a mobile power solution specifically designed for disaster response situations like the Haiti earthquake in 2010, the primary motivating case for this work. A public-private partnership between Arizona State University and NRG Energy was formed to complete the use-inspired design. The mobile system was scoped to meet electricity requirements for a command center, clinic, cellular communications, kitchen, short-term lodging and public lighting, and other critical loads needed to stabilize development in the wake of natural or anthropogenic disaster that destroys the local electrical infrastructure. Deploying modular and self-contained microgrids has the potential to reduce human harm following disaster by providing a decentralized network of electrical generation assets designed to meet critical loads for human survival and well being. In addition, since no two emergency situations are alike, the proposed solution provides flexibility and scalability to meet constraints for local renewable resources, fuel availability, and physical deployment space. The final system includes a 20 kW solar photovoltaic (PV) array, 10 kWh of lithium-ion battery storage, a 10 kW inverter system, a control computer, and a 20 kW diesel generator for supplemental power. The solar array is packed within a 20' steel shipping container for ease and safe transport, thereby making the solution {"}containerized.{"} Components must be firmly mounted or secured to the walls and floors of the container for transport via a cargo freighter or helicopter. A second room was created inside the container to separate the generator from the batteries for safety purposes. The prototype can be fully deployed and functional in less than one hour's time, and was tested against a load bank during various times of the day to illustrate how the power system controls shift operation between batteries, solar PV, and the generator. Sustainability, ethics, health, and safety features were considered in relation to the design specifications, manufacturability, and design scalability. These considerations included the lifecycle of the container, maintenance, modularity, intuitive operation, accessibility, and component temperature regulation, among others. Integration of other technologies such as wind power generation and water purification have the potential to bring further benefit through the plug-and-play containerized micro-grid solution.",
author = "Samantha Janko and Shaun Atkinson and Nathan Johnson",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1115/DETC2016-60296",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2A-2016",
booktitle = "42nd Design Automation Conference",
publisher = "American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Design and fabrication of a containerized micro-grid for disaster relief and off-grid applications

AU - Janko, Samantha

AU - Atkinson, Shaun

AU - Johnson, Nathan

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Rapid solutions are needed throughout the world to meet electrical demands for disaster relief, stabilizing development, industrial or research centers, exploratory drilling and mining, military stationing, and other off-grid or weak-grid applications. This need for on-demand power requires a mobile, modular, and self-sufficient power system designed for rapid deployment and seamless integration. This paper describes a mobile power solution specifically designed for disaster response situations like the Haiti earthquake in 2010, the primary motivating case for this work. A public-private partnership between Arizona State University and NRG Energy was formed to complete the use-inspired design. The mobile system was scoped to meet electricity requirements for a command center, clinic, cellular communications, kitchen, short-term lodging and public lighting, and other critical loads needed to stabilize development in the wake of natural or anthropogenic disaster that destroys the local electrical infrastructure. Deploying modular and self-contained microgrids has the potential to reduce human harm following disaster by providing a decentralized network of electrical generation assets designed to meet critical loads for human survival and well being. In addition, since no two emergency situations are alike, the proposed solution provides flexibility and scalability to meet constraints for local renewable resources, fuel availability, and physical deployment space. The final system includes a 20 kW solar photovoltaic (PV) array, 10 kWh of lithium-ion battery storage, a 10 kW inverter system, a control computer, and a 20 kW diesel generator for supplemental power. The solar array is packed within a 20' steel shipping container for ease and safe transport, thereby making the solution "containerized." Components must be firmly mounted or secured to the walls and floors of the container for transport via a cargo freighter or helicopter. A second room was created inside the container to separate the generator from the batteries for safety purposes. The prototype can be fully deployed and functional in less than one hour's time, and was tested against a load bank during various times of the day to illustrate how the power system controls shift operation between batteries, solar PV, and the generator. Sustainability, ethics, health, and safety features were considered in relation to the design specifications, manufacturability, and design scalability. These considerations included the lifecycle of the container, maintenance, modularity, intuitive operation, accessibility, and component temperature regulation, among others. Integration of other technologies such as wind power generation and water purification have the potential to bring further benefit through the plug-and-play containerized micro-grid solution.

AB - Rapid solutions are needed throughout the world to meet electrical demands for disaster relief, stabilizing development, industrial or research centers, exploratory drilling and mining, military stationing, and other off-grid or weak-grid applications. This need for on-demand power requires a mobile, modular, and self-sufficient power system designed for rapid deployment and seamless integration. This paper describes a mobile power solution specifically designed for disaster response situations like the Haiti earthquake in 2010, the primary motivating case for this work. A public-private partnership between Arizona State University and NRG Energy was formed to complete the use-inspired design. The mobile system was scoped to meet electricity requirements for a command center, clinic, cellular communications, kitchen, short-term lodging and public lighting, and other critical loads needed to stabilize development in the wake of natural or anthropogenic disaster that destroys the local electrical infrastructure. Deploying modular and self-contained microgrids has the potential to reduce human harm following disaster by providing a decentralized network of electrical generation assets designed to meet critical loads for human survival and well being. In addition, since no two emergency situations are alike, the proposed solution provides flexibility and scalability to meet constraints for local renewable resources, fuel availability, and physical deployment space. The final system includes a 20 kW solar photovoltaic (PV) array, 10 kWh of lithium-ion battery storage, a 10 kW inverter system, a control computer, and a 20 kW diesel generator for supplemental power. The solar array is packed within a 20' steel shipping container for ease and safe transport, thereby making the solution "containerized." Components must be firmly mounted or secured to the walls and floors of the container for transport via a cargo freighter or helicopter. A second room was created inside the container to separate the generator from the batteries for safety purposes. The prototype can be fully deployed and functional in less than one hour's time, and was tested against a load bank during various times of the day to illustrate how the power system controls shift operation between batteries, solar PV, and the generator. Sustainability, ethics, health, and safety features were considered in relation to the design specifications, manufacturability, and design scalability. These considerations included the lifecycle of the container, maintenance, modularity, intuitive operation, accessibility, and component temperature regulation, among others. Integration of other technologies such as wind power generation and water purification have the potential to bring further benefit through the plug-and-play containerized micro-grid solution.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85008151881&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85008151881&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1115/DETC2016-60296

DO - 10.1115/DETC2016-60296

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:85008151881

VL - 2A-2016

BT - 42nd Design Automation Conference

PB - American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)

ER -