Design, analysis and implementation of integrated micro-thermal control systems

Jennifer Blain Christen, Andreas G. Andreou

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

While there has been a growing emergence of circuit designs for the life sciences, there is an important issue that remains largely unaddressed. Although advanced design techniques have been applied to circuits capable of measuring very small amplitude, high signal to noise ratio signals, with many custom circuit designs for these applications [1][2][3][4], there remains a proverbial elephant in the room. The systems used to measure these signals provide no means of accurate thermal control. This is especially surprising considering the huge dependance in the behavior of both biological and electrical systems upon temperature. In fact, the vast majority of electrical cellular assays are performed on dying cells! We present a systematic method of incorporating a high-accuracy, closed-loop thermal feedback system into hybrid systems for the life sciences. We introduce a thermal stabilization chip containing a heater and PTAT temperature sensor including the heater control circuit. We then provide a description of the PID control loop. This is followed by both computational data via finite element analysis and empirical data that assesses the thermal performance of the chip. Finally, we demonstrate the advantages of the system with comparative results of cell culture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems
Pages2011-2014
Number of pages4
StatePublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes
Event2007 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems, ISCAS 2007 - New Orleans, LA, United States
Duration: May 27 2007May 30 2007

Other

Other2007 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems, ISCAS 2007
CountryUnited States
CityNew Orleans, LA
Period5/27/075/30/07

Fingerprint

Control systems
Networks (circuits)
Three term control systems
Temperature sensors
Hybrid systems
Cell culture
Assays
Signal to noise ratio
Stabilization
Feedback
Finite element method
Hot Temperature
Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Blain Christen, J., & Andreou, A. G. (2007). Design, analysis and implementation of integrated micro-thermal control systems. In Proceedings - IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (pp. 2011-2014). [4253062]

Design, analysis and implementation of integrated micro-thermal control systems. / Blain Christen, Jennifer; Andreou, Andreas G.

Proceedings - IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems. 2007. p. 2011-2014 4253062.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Blain Christen, J & Andreou, AG 2007, Design, analysis and implementation of integrated micro-thermal control systems. in Proceedings - IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems., 4253062, pp. 2011-2014, 2007 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems, ISCAS 2007, New Orleans, LA, United States, 5/27/07.
Blain Christen J, Andreou AG. Design, analysis and implementation of integrated micro-thermal control systems. In Proceedings - IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems. 2007. p. 2011-2014. 4253062
Blain Christen, Jennifer ; Andreou, Andreas G. / Design, analysis and implementation of integrated micro-thermal control systems. Proceedings - IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems. 2007. pp. 2011-2014
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