Dependence of giant magnetoresistance on Cu-layer thickness in Co/Cu multilayers

A simple dilution effect

S. S P Parkin, Anjenaya Modak, David Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The dependence of the giant magnetoresistance in Co/Cu multilayers on Cu spacer layer thickness is shown to be surprisingly straightforward for multilayers comprised of thin Co layers. At 4.2 K the magnetoresistance decays simply as the inverse Cu spacer layer thickness, which we consider to be a result of dilution of the Co/Cu interfacial regions which give rise to the giant magnetoresistance effect. At 295 K there is an additional exponential decay whose decay length we attribute to volume scattering within the Cu layers. High-resolution cross-section transmission electron micrographs show a high degree of structural ordering within the Cu layers and across the Co/Cu interfaces, perhaps accounting for the long volume scattering lengths (300 at 295 K) found within the Cu layers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9136-9139
Number of pages4
JournalPhysical Review B
Volume47
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

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Giant magnetoresistance
Dilution
dilution
Multilayers
Scattering
Magnetoresistance
spacers
Electrons
decay
scattering
high resolution
cross sections
electrons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Dependence of giant magnetoresistance on Cu-layer thickness in Co/Cu multilayers : A simple dilution effect. / Parkin, S. S P; Modak, Anjenaya; Smith, David.

In: Physical Review B, Vol. 47, No. 14, 1993, p. 9136-9139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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