Democracy

Terence Ball

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several years ago I participated in a round table discussion on ‘Our Responsibilities Toward Future Generations’ at a small liberal arts college in the American midwest. One of my fellow discussants was a theologian, the other a state legislator. Despite our differences, we all agreed that we do not pay sufficient heed to the health and wellbeing of our distant descendants and that this represents a kind of moral myopia that calls for correction. Sometime during the discussion I turned to the state legislator – a thoughtful and sensitive man of enlightened outlook – and asked him point-blank why our elected representatives don’t pay much (if any) attention to the fate of future people, and still less to that of non-human creatures. ‘Because they don’t vote’, was his prompt reply. (He might have added that future people and animals don’t contribute money to political campaigns either.) That, in a nutshell, sums up one of the chief shortcomings of democracy, at least from an environmental or green perspective. I should perhaps qualify this by saying that I am talking about democracy as presently understood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPolitical Theory and the Ecological Challange
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages131-147
Number of pages17
Volume9780521838108
ISBN (Print)9780511617805, 9780521838108
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006

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democracy
roundtable discussion
theologian
voter
money
campaign
animal
art
responsibility
health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Ball, T. (2006). Democracy. In Political Theory and the Ecological Challange (Vol. 9780521838108, pp. 131-147). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511617805.009

Democracy. / Ball, Terence.

Political Theory and the Ecological Challange. Vol. 9780521838108 Cambridge University Press, 2006. p. 131-147.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Ball, T 2006, Democracy. in Political Theory and the Ecological Challange. vol. 9780521838108, Cambridge University Press, pp. 131-147. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511617805.009
Ball T. Democracy. In Political Theory and the Ecological Challange. Vol. 9780521838108. Cambridge University Press. 2006. p. 131-147 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511617805.009
Ball, Terence. / Democracy. Political Theory and the Ecological Challange. Vol. 9780521838108 Cambridge University Press, 2006. pp. 131-147
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