Deficits in sequential processing manifest in motor and linguistic tasks in a multigenerational family with childhood apraxia of speech

Beate Peter, Le Button, Carol Stoel-Gammon, Kathy Chapman, Wendy H. Raskind

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate a global deficit in sequential processing as candidate endophenotypein a family with familial childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). Of 10 adults and 13 children in a three-generational family with speech sound disorder (SSD) consistent with CAS, 3 adults and 6 children had past or present SSD diagnoses. Two preschoolers with unremediated CAS showed a high number of sequencing errors during single-word production. Performance on tasks with high sequential processing loads differentiated between the affected and unaffected family members, whereas there were no group differences in tasks with low processing loads. Adults with a history of SSD produced more sequencing errors during nonword and multisyllabic real word imitation, compared to those without such a history. Results are consistent with a global deficit in sequential processing that influences speech development as well as cognitive and linguistic processing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)163-191
Number of pages29
JournalClinical Linguistics and Phonetics
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

Keywords

  • Memory encoding
  • Motor programming
  • Reading
  • Speech sound disorder
  • Spelling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

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