Defect Parameters Contour Mapping: A Powerful Tool for Lifetime Spectroscopy Data Analysis

Simone Bernardini, Tine U. Naerland, Gianluca Coletti, Mariana Bertoni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Temperature- and injection-dependent lifetime spectroscopy (TIDLS) is extensively used for the characterization of defects in silicon material for photovoltaic applications. By coupling TIDLS measurements with Shockley–Read–Hall recombination models, the most important defects’ parameters can be assessed including the defect energy level Et and the capture cross section ratio k. However, while proving extremely helpful in a variety of studies aiming at the characterization of contaminated silicon, a generalized approach for the analysis of industrially-relevant material has not yet emerged. In this contribution, we examine in detail the recently introduced defect parameters contour mapping (DPCM) methodology for TIDLS data analysis as a tool for direct visualization of possible lifetime limiting defects. Herein, we showcase the DPCM method's potential by applying it to two representative case studies selected from literature and we demonstrate that, even when data are scarce, invaluable information is obtained in an easy and intuitive way without any a priori assumption needed. We then apply the DPCM method to simulated TIDLS data to evaluate the general characteristics of its response and the optimal conditions for its application. This analysis proves that the temperature dependence of lifetime is the most critical information required toward a really univocal identification of metal impurities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1800082
JournalPhysica Status Solidi (B) Basic Research
Volume255
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2018

Fingerprint

Spectroscopy
life (durability)
Defects
defects
spectroscopy
injection
Silicon
Temperature
temperature
silicon
absorption cross sections
Electron energy levels
Visualization
energy levels
Metals
methodology
Impurities
impurities
temperature dependence
metals

Keywords

  • defect parameters contour mapping (DPCM)
  • defects
  • lifetime spectroscopy
  • semiconductors
  • solar cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Defect Parameters Contour Mapping : A Powerful Tool for Lifetime Spectroscopy Data Analysis. / Bernardini, Simone; Naerland, Tine U.; Coletti, Gianluca; Bertoni, Mariana.

In: Physica Status Solidi (B) Basic Research, Vol. 255, No. 8, 1800082, 01.08.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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