Deciphering the evolutionary history of open and closed mitosis

Shelley Sazer, Michael Lynch, Daniel Needleman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The origin of the nucleus at the prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition represents one of the most important events in the evolution of cellular organization. The nuclear envelope encircles the chromosomes in interphase and is a selectively permeable barrier between the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm and an organizational scaffold for the nucleus. It remains intact in the 'closed' mitosis of some yeasts, but loses its integrity in the 'open' mitosis of mammals. Instances of both types of mitosis within two evolutionary clades indicate multiple evolutionary transitions between open and closed mitosis, although the underlying genetic changes that influenced these transitions remain unknown. A survey of the diversity of mitotic nuclei that fall between these extremes is the starting point from which to determine the physiologically relevant characteristics distinguishing open from closed mitosis and to understand how they evolved and why they are retained in present-day organisms. The field is now poised to begin addressing these issues by defining and documenting patterns of mitotic nuclear variation within and among species and mapping them onto a phylogenic tree. Deciphering the evolutionary history of open and closed mitosis will complement cell biological and genetic approaches aimed at deciphering the fundamental organizational principles of the nucleus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)R1099-R1103
JournalCurrent Biology
Volume24
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mammals
Chromosomes
Mitosis
Scaffolds
Yeast
mitosis
History
history
Interphase
Nuclear Envelope
nuclear membrane
prokaryotic cells
Eukaryota
interphase
eukaryotic cells
Cytoplasm
complement
cytoplasm
Yeasts
mammals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Deciphering the evolutionary history of open and closed mitosis. / Sazer, Shelley; Lynch, Michael; Needleman, Daniel.

In: Current Biology, Vol. 24, No. 22, 01.01.2014, p. R1099-R1103.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Sazer, Shelley ; Lynch, Michael ; Needleman, Daniel. / Deciphering the evolutionary history of open and closed mitosis. In: Current Biology. 2014 ; Vol. 24, No. 22. pp. R1099-R1103.
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