Daughters and mothers exercising together (DAMET): Effects of home- and university-based interventions on physical activity behavior and family relations

Lynda B. Ransdell, Eric Eastep, Alison Taylor, Darcie Oakland, Jenny Schmidt, Laurie Moyer-Mileur, Barry Shultz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study compared two interventions in terms of impact on physical activity participation and mother–daughter relations. Previously sedentary mothers and daughters (N = 34) were randomly assigned to a 12-week university- or home-based physical activity group. Program activities were designed using focus group information, aspects of the social cognitive theory, and information from previously successful interventions. The university-based group met three times a week for fitness building and recreational activities. The home-based group received a packet of information and training to perform activities in or near the home. Changes in physical activity and family bonding were assessed for mothers and daughters separately using a 2 (group)(2 (time) repeated measures analysis of variance. On completing the program, mothers and daughters in each group reported increased participation in physical activity (p=.02 to .000). The majority of mothers (94%) and daughters (88%) agreed that “my relationship with my daughter/mother has improved as a result of participating in physical activity together.” On the Parental Bonding Instrument daughters reported no statistically significant changes in their perceptions of “mom's level of caring” (p=.73); however, “mom's level of control” (p ≤ .05) increased. Group by Time interactions were not significant, indicating that there were no differences between results from either program. Both home- and university-based physical activity programs may be viable paradigms in which to improve family relations and increase physical activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-29
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Education
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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