Daughters and mothers exercising together (DAMET)

Effects of home- and university-based interventions on physical activity behavior and family relations

Lynda B. Ransdell, Eric Eastep, Alison Taylor, Darcie Oakland, Jenny Schmidt, Laurie Moyer-Mileur, Barry Shultz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study compared two interventions in terms of impact on physical activity participation and mother–daughter relations. Previously sedentary mothers and daughters (N = 34) were randomly assigned to a 12-week university- or home-based physical activity group. Program activities were designed using focus group information, aspects of the social cognitive theory, and information from previously successful interventions. The university-based group met three times a week for fitness building and recreational activities. The home-based group received a packet of information and training to perform activities in or near the home. Changes in physical activity and family bonding were assessed for mothers and daughters separately using a 2 (group)(2 (time) repeated measures analysis of variance. On completing the program, mothers and daughters in each group reported increased participation in physical activity (p=.02 to .000). The majority of mothers (94%) and daughters (88%) agreed that “my relationship with my daughter/mother has improved as a result of participating in physical activity together.” On the Parental Bonding Instrument daughters reported no statistically significant changes in their perceptions of “mom's level of caring” (p=.73); however, “mom's level of control” (p ≤ .05) increased. Group by Time interactions were not significant, indicating that there were no differences between results from either program. Both home- and university-based physical activity programs may be viable paradigms in which to improve family relations and increase physical activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-29
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Education
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Family Relations
Nuclear Family
Mothers
Exercise
university
Group
Group Homes
building activity
Focus Groups
participation
recreational activity
cognitive theory
Analysis of Variance
fitness
analysis of variance
paradigm

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Daughters and mothers exercising together (DAMET) : Effects of home- and university-based interventions on physical activity behavior and family relations. / Ransdell, Lynda B.; Eastep, Eric; Taylor, Alison; Oakland, Darcie; Schmidt, Jenny; Moyer-Mileur, Laurie; Shultz, Barry.

In: American Journal of Health Education, Vol. 34, No. 1, 2003, p. 19-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ransdell, Lynda B. ; Eastep, Eric ; Taylor, Alison ; Oakland, Darcie ; Schmidt, Jenny ; Moyer-Mileur, Laurie ; Shultz, Barry. / Daughters and mothers exercising together (DAMET) : Effects of home- and university-based interventions on physical activity behavior and family relations. In: American Journal of Health Education. 2003 ; Vol. 34, No. 1. pp. 19-29.
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