Daughters and mothers exercising together (DAMET): A 12-week pilot project designed to improve physical self-perception and increase recreational physical activity

Lynda B. Ransdell, Jessica Dratt, Cathy Kennedy, Sean O’Neill, Dale DeVoe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper presents the results of a 12-week single-sex, family-based physical activity intervention grounded in Social Cognitive Theory. Mother/daughter pairs and triads (n = 20) attended physical activity and classroom sessions twice weekly. Physiological data (VO2peak, height, and weight), psychological data (physical self-perception profile subscale scores), information about physical activity participation (PAP, d?wk21) and qualitative impressions (QI) of the program were collected pre-and post-intervention. PAP and QI were also collected 6-months after completing the intervention. Although no significant increases in physical activity were reported, significant improvements in perceived sport competence, physical condition, and strength and muscularity were reported over time. The social cognitive theory, as used to plan this physical activity intervention, offered a promising theoretical perspective for facilitating improved physical self-perception in adolescent girls and their mothers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-129
Number of pages17
JournalWomen and Health
Volume33
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 21 2001

Keywords

  • Adolescent girls
  • Aerobic capacity
  • Family intervention
  • Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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