Data and methods comparing social structure and vegetation structure of urban neighborhoods in Baltimore, Maryland

J. Morgan Grove, Mary L. Cadenasso, William R. Burch, Steward T.A. Pickett, Kirsten Schwarz, Jarlath O'Neil-Dunne, Matthew Wilson, Austin Troy, Christopher Boone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

104 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent advances in remote sensing and the adoption of geographic information systems (GIS) have greatly increased the availability of high-resolution spatial and attribute data for examining the relationship between social and vegetation structure in urban areas. There are several motivations for understanding this relationship. First, the United States has experienced a significant increase in the extent of urbanized land. Second, urban foresters increasingly recognize their need for data about urban forestry types, owners and property regimes, and associated social goods, benefits, and services. Third, previous research has focused primarily on the distribution of vegetation cover or diversity. However, little is known about (1) whether vegetation structure varies among urban neighborhoods and (2) whether the motivations, pathways, and capacities for vegetation management vary among households and communities. In this article, we describe novel data and methods from Baltimore, MD, and the Baltimore Ecosystem Study (BES) to address these two questions. Copyright;

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-136
Number of pages20
JournalSociety and Natural Resources
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Baltimore
  • LTER
  • Landcover
  • Remote-sensing
  • Social structure
  • Urban ecology
  • Vegetation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Development
  • Environmental Science (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

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  • Cite this

    Grove, J. M., Cadenasso, M. L., Burch, W. R., Pickett, S. T. A., Schwarz, K., O'Neil-Dunne, J., Wilson, M., Troy, A., & Boone, C. (2006). Data and methods comparing social structure and vegetation structure of urban neighborhoods in Baltimore, Maryland. Society and Natural Resources, 19(2), 117-136. https://doi.org/10.1080/08941920500394501