Dallas independent school district test with best value

D. T. Kashiwagi, D. Parmar, J. Savicky

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    The Dallas Independent School District (DISD) was plagued by bad construction in the 1990s and sought an unbiased process that could alleviate the problems. The Performance Information Procurement System (PIPS) was identified as an unbiased process that minimized subjectivity and risk. The DISD implemented the PIPS on the procurement of nine roofs worth $4.5M. The objectives of the tests were to increase the number of contractors and manufacturers participating, the performance of the roofers in terms of warranty, service, and construction, and to change the environment from adversarial to partnering. The DISD faced several problems in the implementation of the PIPS process, these included a lack of experience handling performance information, an inability to restrict their decision making based on their subjective past experience and, the most difficult task, accepting the PIPS structural concept of minimal project management and inspection. The results were very encouraging. The results showed that the goals could be met because the number of contractors increased from 3 to 21, the number of manufacturers increased from 3 to 11, the roofs procured were 15% under the budget, the environment changed to partnering and contractors began servicing DISD roofs. This article discusses the problems encountered, implementation of the process, and lessons learned. Also explained: The minimization of the owner's liability, disagreements, and information management using PIPS.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationProceedings, Annual Conference - Canadian Society for Civil Engineering
    Pages960-966
    Number of pages7
    Volume2003
    StatePublished - 2003
    EventCanadian Society for Civil Engineering - 31st Annual Conference: 2003 Building our Civilization - Moncton, NB, Canada
    Duration: Jun 4 2003Jun 7 2003

    Other

    OtherCanadian Society for Civil Engineering - 31st Annual Conference: 2003 Building our Civilization
    CountryCanada
    CityMoncton, NB
    Period6/4/036/7/03

    Fingerprint

    Information systems
    Contractors
    Roofs
    Project management
    Information management
    Inspection
    Decision making

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Engineering(all)

    Cite this

    Kashiwagi, D. T., Parmar, D., & Savicky, J. (2003). Dallas independent school district test with best value. In Proceedings, Annual Conference - Canadian Society for Civil Engineering (Vol. 2003, pp. 960-966)

    Dallas independent school district test with best value. / Kashiwagi, D. T.; Parmar, D.; Savicky, J.

    Proceedings, Annual Conference - Canadian Society for Civil Engineering. Vol. 2003 2003. p. 960-966.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Kashiwagi, DT, Parmar, D & Savicky, J 2003, Dallas independent school district test with best value. in Proceedings, Annual Conference - Canadian Society for Civil Engineering. vol. 2003, pp. 960-966, Canadian Society for Civil Engineering - 31st Annual Conference: 2003 Building our Civilization, Moncton, NB, Canada, 6/4/03.
    Kashiwagi DT, Parmar D, Savicky J. Dallas independent school district test with best value. In Proceedings, Annual Conference - Canadian Society for Civil Engineering. Vol. 2003. 2003. p. 960-966
    Kashiwagi, D. T. ; Parmar, D. ; Savicky, J. / Dallas independent school district test with best value. Proceedings, Annual Conference - Canadian Society for Civil Engineering. Vol. 2003 2003. pp. 960-966
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