Cyclopean motion perception produced by oscillations of size, disparity and location

R. Gray, D. Regan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

For cyclopean and monocularly-visible targets we measured psychophysical thresholds for perceptions produced by the following three stimuli: oscillations of disparity (DO), oscillations of size (SO) and oscillatory motion within the frontoparallel plane (FPO). Results: thresholds for motion in depth perception produced by DO were similar for cyclopean and non-cyclopean targets over the entire 0.25-8 Hz frequency range investigated. Thresholds for perceiving motion in depth produced by SO were considerably (up to 2.5 times) higher for cyclopean targets than for monocularly-visible targets, as were thresholds for perceiving size oscillations. For both cyclopean and monocularly-visible target the perception of motion in depth could be canceled by pitting DO vs SO. Thresholds for perceiving FPO were similar to DO thresholds for the monocularly-visible target, but for the cyclopean targets FPO thresholds rose more steeply than DO thresholds for oscillation frequencies above 1 Hz. Conclusions: (1) for our subjects, the effective binocular stimulus for motion in depth perception is a rate of change of disparity; an interocular velocity difference is significant only to the extent that it produces a rate of change of disparity. (2) The sensations of motion in depth produced by DO and SO are qualitatively identical. (3) Neural signals produced by DO and SO converge onto a single neural mechanism that signals motion in depth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)655-665
Number of pages11
JournalVision Research
Volume36
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1996
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Binocular vision
  • Cyclopean vision
  • Looming
  • Motion
  • Motion in depth
  • Stereomotion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

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