Cyclooxygenase as a target in lung cancer

Joanne R. Brown, Raymond N. DuBois

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

138 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Preclinical studies suggest that cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 may be involved in the molecular pathogenesis of some types of lung cancer. Most of the available studies point to its involvement in non-small cell lung cancer. Survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer expressing high levels of COX-2 is markedly reduced. Treatment of humans with the selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib augments the antitumor effects of chemotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. COX-2 has been shown to regulate some aspects of tumor-associated angiogenesis. Most of the results we have published point to effects on the regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor. However, prostaglandins derived from COX-2 affect other signaling pathways as well, such as the epidermal growth factor and its receptor. Others have recently shown that non-small cell lung cancer exhibits a COX-2 downstream enzyme expression pattern that is altered in lung tumor cells and tumor-supplying vessels. Therefore, COX-2 and prostaglandins may have a major impact on lung tumor progression and tumor-associated inflammation. Clinical trials currently underway are exploring the potential of targeting COX-2 in lung cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical Cancer Research
Volume10
Issue number12 II
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Cyclooxygenase 2
Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases
Lung Neoplasms
Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Celecoxib
Neoplasms
Lung
Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors
Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
Prostaglandins
Clinical Trials
Inflammation
Drug Therapy
Survival
Enzymes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Cyclooxygenase as a target in lung cancer. / Brown, Joanne R.; DuBois, Raymond N.

In: Clinical Cancer Research, Vol. 10, No. 12 II, 15.07.2004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, Joanne R. ; DuBois, Raymond N. / Cyclooxygenase as a target in lung cancer. In: Clinical Cancer Research. 2004 ; Vol. 10, No. 12 II.
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