Current trends and future challenges of electrolytes for sodium-ion batteries

K. Vignarooban, R. Kushagra, A. Elango, P. Badami, B. E. Mellander, X. Xu, T. G. Tucker, Changho Nam, Arunachala Mada Kannan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

87 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research and development efforts on sodium-ion batteries are gaining momentum due to their potential to accommodate high energy density coupled with relatively lower cost in comparison with lithium-ion batteries. In order for the sodium-ion batteries to be commercially viable, high performance electrolytes with acceptable ambient temperature ionic conductivity and wider electrochemical stability windows are being developed. A bibliometric analysis of the publications on various types of Na+ ion conducting electrolytes since 1990 shows a total of 200 + publications and reveals an exponential growth in the last few years, due to reasons that the sodium-ion systems promise great potential as the future large scale power sources for variety of applications. This review consolidates the status of liquid (non-aqueous, aqueous and ionic), polymer gel and solid (ceramics, glasses, and solid polymers) electrolytes and discusses their ionic conductivity, thermal characteristics, electrochemical stability and viscosity towards applications in sodium-ion batteries. Among various types available, the non-aqueous solvent based electrolyte is the most promising one in terms of ionic conductivity even though it is flammable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2829-2846
Number of pages18
JournalInternational Journal of Hydrogen Energy
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 30 2016

Fingerprint

electric batteries
Electrolytes
Sodium
sodium
electrolytes
trends
Ionic conductivity
Ions
ion currents
ions
Glass ceramics
Polymers
polymers
research and development
Momentum
Gels
ambient temperature
Viscosity
flux density
lithium

Keywords

  • Ceramic electrolytes
  • Ionic conductivity
  • Ionic liquids
  • Liquid electrolytes
  • Polymer electrolytes
  • Sodium ion batteries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Fuel Technology
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology

Cite this

Current trends and future challenges of electrolytes for sodium-ion batteries. / Vignarooban, K.; Kushagra, R.; Elango, A.; Badami, P.; Mellander, B. E.; Xu, X.; Tucker, T. G.; Nam, Changho; Mada Kannan, Arunachala.

In: International Journal of Hydrogen Energy, Vol. 41, No. 4, 30.01.2016, p. 2829-2846.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vignarooban, K, Kushagra, R, Elango, A, Badami, P, Mellander, BE, Xu, X, Tucker, TG, Nam, C & Mada Kannan, A 2016, 'Current trends and future challenges of electrolytes for sodium-ion batteries', International Journal of Hydrogen Energy, vol. 41, no. 4, pp. 2829-2846. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijhydene.2015.12.090
Vignarooban, K. ; Kushagra, R. ; Elango, A. ; Badami, P. ; Mellander, B. E. ; Xu, X. ; Tucker, T. G. ; Nam, Changho ; Mada Kannan, Arunachala. / Current trends and future challenges of electrolytes for sodium-ion batteries. In: International Journal of Hydrogen Energy. 2016 ; Vol. 41, No. 4. pp. 2829-2846.
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