Current research on the treatment of primary sclerosing cholangitis

Ahmad H. Ali, Elizabeth J. Carey, Keith Lindor

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a progressive disease of the liver characterized by inflammation and destruction of the intra-and/or extra-hepatic bile ducts, leading to fibrosis and ultimately liver failure, cirrhosis and an increased risk of malignancy. The etiology of PSC is unclear. It is often associated with the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), particularly Ulcerative Colitis (UC); up to 75% of PSC patients have UC. PSC is more prevalent in men than in women. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been extensively studied in PSC in randomized clinical trials but failed to show a positive impact on the natural course of the disease. Currently, there is no effective medical therapy for PSC, and the majority of patients will eventually require liver transplantation. PSC is one of the leading indications for liver transplantation. In this paper, we review the current research on the potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of PSC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalIntractable and Rare Diseases Research
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Sclerosing Cholangitis
Research
Therapeutics
Ulcerative Colitis
Liver Transplantation
Common Hepatic Duct
Ursodeoxycholic Acid
Liver Failure
Bile Ducts
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Liver Cirrhosis
Liver Diseases
Fibrosis
Randomized Controlled Trials
Inflammation

Keywords

  • Obeticholic acid
  • Primary sclerosing cholangitis
  • Ursodeoxycholic acid
  • Vancomycin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Current research on the treatment of primary sclerosing cholangitis. / Ali, Ahmad H.; Carey, Elizabeth J.; Lindor, Keith.

In: Intractable and Rare Diseases Research, Vol. 4, No. 1, 2015, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

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