Cultures differ in the ability to enhance affective neural responses

Michael Varnum, Ryan S. Hampton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study (N = 55) used an event-related potential paradigm to investigate whether cultures differ in the ability to upregulate affective responses. Using stimuli selected from the International Affective Picture System, we found that European-Americans (N = 29) enhanced central-parietal late positive potential (LPP) (400–800 ms post-stimulus) responses to affective stimuli when instructed to do so, whereas East Asians (N = 26) did not. We observed cultural differences in the ability to enhance central-parietal LPP responses for both positively and negativelyvalenced stimuli, and the ability to enhance these two types of responses was positively correlated for Americans but negatively for East Asians. These results are consistent with the notion that cultural variations in norms and values regarding affective expression and experiences shape how the brain regulates emotions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalSocial Neuroscience
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jul 18 2016

Fingerprint

Aptitude
brain
stimulus
ability
Evoked Potentials
Emotions
Up-Regulation
cultural difference
emotion
Brain
paradigm
norm
event
Values
experience

Keywords

  • cultural neuroscience
  • Culture
  • emotion regulation
  • ERP
  • LPP

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Development
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Cultures differ in the ability to enhance affective neural responses. / Varnum, Michael; Hampton, Ryan S.

In: Social Neuroscience, 18.07.2016, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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