Culture and Well-Being Among Cambodian American Adolescents: Mediating Effects of Parental, Peer, and School Attachments

Khanh T. Dinh, Allyssa McCabe, Jenn Yun Tein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study investigated a mediation model of the relationship of acculturation, enculturation, and intergenerational cultural conflict to mental and physical health among 222 Cambodian American adolescents residing in the northeast region of the United States. Social mediators were mother- child, father- child, peer, and school attachments. In addition, as an exploratory analysis, gender was examined as a moderator to illuminate potential differences between girls and boys in the mediation model. The results partially supported the hypothesized mediation model, indicating that mother- child attachment and school attachment were significant mediators in the relationship of cultural variables to mental and physical health problems. Furthermore, the mediation effects were similar across girls and boys, except for the associations between intergenerational cultural conflict, school attachment, and well-being. This study provides important implications for future research and interventions in addressing the cultural and social challenges faced by Cambodian American adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAsian American Journal of Psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2020

Keywords

  • Cambodian American adolescents
  • Cultural orientation
  • Intergenerational cultural conflict
  • Social attachments
  • Well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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