Cultural repertoires: Indigenous youth creating with place and story

Kristin A. Searle, Teresa Casort, Breanne K. Litts, Bryan Brayboy, Sequoia Lynn Dance, Yasmin Kafai

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, we present an example of culturally-responsive making in the context of developing location-based community stories. Working with members of an Indigenous community in the Southwestern United States, we co-designed and implemented a two-week summer camp in which middle school youth used Augmented Reality and Interactive Storytelling (ARIS), a narrative-based programming tool, to create virtual community tours for the purpose of sharing the information they learned about tribally owned locations with others. We developed case studies of two groups of students who incorporated culture into their community tours of a tribally-owned golf course complex and stadium complex to address the following question: How did small groups of youth conceptualize culture and how did they integrate it into their community tours? In the discussion, we address what can we learn from youths’ design processes and completed products about designing culturally responsive learning experiences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)697-704
Number of pages8
JournalProceedings of International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS
Volume2
Issue number2018-June
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Event13th International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2018: Rethinking Learning in the Digital Age: Making the Learning Sciences Count - London, United Kingdom
Duration: Jun 23 2018Jun 27 2018

Fingerprint

Stadiums
Augmented reality
community
Students
youth culture
virtual community
small group
programming
narrative
learning
experience
Group
student

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science (miscellaneous)
  • Education

Cite this

Searle, K. A., Casort, T., Litts, B. K., Brayboy, B., Dance, S. L., & Kafai, Y. (2018). Cultural repertoires: Indigenous youth creating with place and story. Proceedings of International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS, 2(2018-June), 697-704.

Cultural repertoires : Indigenous youth creating with place and story. / Searle, Kristin A.; Casort, Teresa; Litts, Breanne K.; Brayboy, Bryan; Dance, Sequoia Lynn; Kafai, Yasmin.

In: Proceedings of International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS, Vol. 2, No. 2018-June, 01.01.2018, p. 697-704.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Searle, KA, Casort, T, Litts, BK, Brayboy, B, Dance, SL & Kafai, Y 2018, 'Cultural repertoires: Indigenous youth creating with place and story', Proceedings of International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS, vol. 2, no. 2018-June, pp. 697-704.
Searle, Kristin A. ; Casort, Teresa ; Litts, Breanne K. ; Brayboy, Bryan ; Dance, Sequoia Lynn ; Kafai, Yasmin. / Cultural repertoires : Indigenous youth creating with place and story. In: Proceedings of International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS. 2018 ; Vol. 2, No. 2018-June. pp. 697-704.
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