Critical bands and critical ratios in animal psychoacoustics: An example using chinchilla data

William Yost, William P. Shofner

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    11 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This paper suggests that critical ratios obtained in noise-masked tone studies are not good indicators of critical bandwidths obtained in both human and nonhuman animal subjects. A probe-tone detection study using chinchilla subjects suggests that they may be broadband processors in detection tasks as opposed to human subjects who use narrow-band, critical-band processing. If chinchilla and other nonhuman animal subjects are wideband processors, this can partially explain why their critical ratios are significantly greater than those measured in human subjects. Thus, large critical ratios obtained for nonhuman animals may indicate processing inefficiency rather than wide critical bands.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)315-323
    Number of pages9
    JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
    Volume125
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 29 2009

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    psychoacoustics
    animals
    central processing units
    broadband
    narrowband
    bandwidth
    probes
    Psychoacoustics
    Animals
    Nonhuman Animals
    Human Subjects

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
    • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

    Cite this

    Critical bands and critical ratios in animal psychoacoustics : An example using chinchilla data. / Yost, William; Shofner, William P.

    In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 125, No. 1, 29.01.2009, p. 315-323.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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