Criminal justice theory: Explaining the nature and behavior of criminal justice

David E. Duffee, Edward Maguire

Research output: Book/ReportBook

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Criminal Justice Theory is the first comprehensive volume on the theoretical foundations of criminal justice. The authors argue that theory in criminal justice is currently underdeveloped and inconsistently applied, especially in comparison to the role of theory in the study of crime itself. In the diverse range of essays included here, the authors and contributors integrate examples from the study of criminal justice systems, judicial decision-making, courtroom communities, and correctional systems, building the argument that students of criminal justice must not evaluate their discipline solely on the basis of the effectiveness of specific measures in reducing the crime rate. Rather, if they hope to improve the system, they must acquire a systematic knowledge of the causes behind the structures, policies, and practices of criminal justice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
PublisherRoutledge Taylor & Francis Group
Number of pages380
ISBN (Print)0203941209, 9780203941201
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 28 2007
Externally publishedYes

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justice
crime rate
offense
decision making
cause
community
student

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Criminal justice theory : Explaining the nature and behavior of criminal justice. / Duffee, David E.; Maguire, Edward.

Routledge Taylor & Francis Group, 2007. 380 p.

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Duffee, David E. ; Maguire, Edward. / Criminal justice theory : Explaining the nature and behavior of criminal justice. Routledge Taylor & Francis Group, 2007. 380 p.
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