Creep and tensile behaviors of Fe-Cr-Al foils and laser microwelds at high temperature

Haitham El Kadiri, Yves Bienvenu, Kiran Solanki, Mark F. Horstemeyer, Paul T. Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examine a Fe-Cr-Al foil-based material and a continuous-wave laser weld generated in ultra-fine "keyhole" mode undergoing tensile and creep-tension tests over a temperature range of 25-1000 °C. At all temperatures, the bead exhibits superior tensile resistance than the base material due to a homogenous reprecipitation of fine aluminum nitrides, AlN, but creeps faster at 900 °C, because of a finer-grained microstructure scarcely undergoing secondary recrystallization. Under tensile loading, the base material ductility is higher than that of the weld and increases with increasing temperature, but drops above 900 °C due to faster grain growth and chromium carbide precipitation. The base material stress-strain curves exhibit concomitant decrease of the yield point effect magnitude and increase of the strain hardening rate with the temperature, but only up to a critical value, which decreases with increasing the strain rate. After vanishing at this critical temperature, the yield point effect reappears upon the onset of sample necking responsible for the ensuing continuous decrease of the engineering stress. The strain-stress curves of laser welds show no yield point effect and the work hardening persists at all temperatures. Under creep-tension, the weld shows a strong anisotropic behavior, and the highest flow rate is recorded for welds oriented parallel to the loading direction, because of a more important cavity nucleation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)168-181
Number of pages14
JournalMaterials Science and Engineering A
Volume421
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Metal foil
foils
Creep
Welds
yield point
Lasers
lasers
Stress-strain curves
Strain hardening
Temperature
temperature
chromium carbides
work hardening
strain hardening
aluminum nitrides
continuous wave lasers
curves
ductility
Aluminum nitride
Continuous wave lasers

Keywords

  • Catalytic converter
  • Creep
  • Fe-Cr-Al foil
  • Finite element simulations
  • High temperature
  • Laser welding
  • SEM
  • TEM
  • Tensile

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Creep and tensile behaviors of Fe-Cr-Al foils and laser microwelds at high temperature. / El Kadiri, Haitham; Bienvenu, Yves; Solanki, Kiran; Horstemeyer, Mark F.; Wang, Paul T.

In: Materials Science and Engineering A, Vol. 421, No. 1-2, 15.04.2006, p. 168-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

El Kadiri, Haitham ; Bienvenu, Yves ; Solanki, Kiran ; Horstemeyer, Mark F. ; Wang, Paul T. / Creep and tensile behaviors of Fe-Cr-Al foils and laser microwelds at high temperature. In: Materials Science and Engineering A. 2006 ; Vol. 421, No. 1-2. pp. 168-181.
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AB - We examine a Fe-Cr-Al foil-based material and a continuous-wave laser weld generated in ultra-fine "keyhole" mode undergoing tensile and creep-tension tests over a temperature range of 25-1000 °C. At all temperatures, the bead exhibits superior tensile resistance than the base material due to a homogenous reprecipitation of fine aluminum nitrides, AlN, but creeps faster at 900 °C, because of a finer-grained microstructure scarcely undergoing secondary recrystallization. Under tensile loading, the base material ductility is higher than that of the weld and increases with increasing temperature, but drops above 900 °C due to faster grain growth and chromium carbide precipitation. The base material stress-strain curves exhibit concomitant decrease of the yield point effect magnitude and increase of the strain hardening rate with the temperature, but only up to a critical value, which decreases with increasing the strain rate. After vanishing at this critical temperature, the yield point effect reappears upon the onset of sample necking responsible for the ensuing continuous decrease of the engineering stress. The strain-stress curves of laser welds show no yield point effect and the work hardening persists at all temperatures. Under creep-tension, the weld shows a strong anisotropic behavior, and the highest flow rate is recorded for welds oriented parallel to the loading direction, because of a more important cavity nucleation.

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