Creative justice? The relationship between prospective teachers' prior schooling experiences and perceived importance of promoting student creativity

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17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Prospective teachers (N = 117) enrolled in an introductory educational psychology course completed questions measuring their perceptions of past schooling experiences, current views regarding the importance of promoting student creativity, and their perceived ability to promote creativity. Statistically significant differences were found between the low importance and high importance groups. Prospective teachers who viewed promoting creativity of students as highly important were significantly less likely to indicate that they enjoyed school. In addition, prospective teachers in the high importance group indicated significantly lower levels of experiencing belongingness (relatedness) and significantly lower self-judgments of their past ability to be successful in school (competence). Judgments regarding the choices afforded in school (autonomy) were mixed, but favored prospective teachers who placed less importance on promoting student creativity. Finally, prospective teachers who viewed promoting student creativity as highly important were significantly more likely to indicate that they had the ability to promote student creativity. A creative-justice hypothesis was derived from these results. This hypothesis posits that individuals committed to promoting creativity are driven by their own past experiences with creativity diminishing environments. These individuals then seek out opportunities to transform the experiences of new inhabitants in similar environments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)149-162
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Creative Behavior
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Visual Arts and Performing Arts
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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