Coupled human and natural systems

Jianguo Liu, Thomas Dietz, Stephen R. Carpenter, Carl Folke, Marina Alberti, Charles Redman, Stephen H. Schneider, Elinor Ostrom, Alice N. Pell, Jane Lubchenco, William W. Taylor, Zhiyun Ouyang, Peter Deadman, Timothy Kratz, William Provencher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

445 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Humans have continuously interacted with natural systems, resulting in the formation and development of coupled human and natural systems (CHANS). Recent studies reveal the complexity of organizational, spatial, and temporal couplings of CHANS. These couplings have evolved from direct to more indirect interactions, from adjacent to more distant linkages, from local to global scales, and from simple to complex patterns and processes. Untangling complexities, such as reciprocal effects and emergent properties, can lead to novel scientific discoveries and is essential to developing effective policies for ecological and socioeconomic sustainability. Opportunities for truly integrating various disciplines are emerging to address fundamental questions about CHANS and meet society's unprecedented challenges.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)639-649
Number of pages11
JournalAmbio
Volume36
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2007

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Sustainable development
sustainability
interaction
society
policy
socioeconomics
effect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Liu, J., Dietz, T., Carpenter, S. R., Folke, C., Alberti, M., Redman, C., ... Provencher, W. (2007). Coupled human and natural systems. Ambio, 36(8), 639-649. https://doi.org/10.1579/0044-7447(2007)36[639:CHANS]2.0.CO;2

Coupled human and natural systems. / Liu, Jianguo; Dietz, Thomas; Carpenter, Stephen R.; Folke, Carl; Alberti, Marina; Redman, Charles; Schneider, Stephen H.; Ostrom, Elinor; Pell, Alice N.; Lubchenco, Jane; Taylor, William W.; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Deadman, Peter; Kratz, Timothy; Provencher, William.

In: Ambio, Vol. 36, No. 8, 12.2007, p. 639-649.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Liu, J, Dietz, T, Carpenter, SR, Folke, C, Alberti, M, Redman, C, Schneider, SH, Ostrom, E, Pell, AN, Lubchenco, J, Taylor, WW, Ouyang, Z, Deadman, P, Kratz, T & Provencher, W 2007, 'Coupled human and natural systems', Ambio, vol. 36, no. 8, pp. 639-649. https://doi.org/10.1579/0044-7447(2007)36[639:CHANS]2.0.CO;2
Liu J, Dietz T, Carpenter SR, Folke C, Alberti M, Redman C et al. Coupled human and natural systems. Ambio. 2007 Dec;36(8):639-649. https://doi.org/10.1579/0044-7447(2007)36[639:CHANS]2.0.CO;2
Liu, Jianguo ; Dietz, Thomas ; Carpenter, Stephen R. ; Folke, Carl ; Alberti, Marina ; Redman, Charles ; Schneider, Stephen H. ; Ostrom, Elinor ; Pell, Alice N. ; Lubchenco, Jane ; Taylor, William W. ; Ouyang, Zhiyun ; Deadman, Peter ; Kratz, Timothy ; Provencher, William. / Coupled human and natural systems. In: Ambio. 2007 ; Vol. 36, No. 8. pp. 639-649.
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